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Using Table and Cell Properties to make a Pleasing Site in FrontPage

October 8th 2005

Using Table and Cell Properties to make a Pleasing Site in FrontPage

Website Design

In this tutorial we will discuss tables, images and some aesthetics.  We will describe the creation of tables with the use of Microsoft FrontPage, and how to dress up your website with tables and images.

In an earlier article we described the use of Dynamic Web Templates and spoke briefly about tables.  Most professional websites will use tables inside tables inside tables to create the professional look.  Some of the tables will be hidden from the browser.  Their presence is there only to space other tables or images.

Have you ever seen a webpage that has the text butt right up against a cell or image?  The first letter in each line is pressed right up against the adjacent cell making the first word in every line more difficult to read.

 

 

Let me give you an example:

 

 

 

 

 

This is an example of how difficult an unprofessional a page can look when the text butts right up against an adjacent cell or image.

There are a couple of methods of pulling the text away from the adjacent cell.  The quickest is to enlarge the table padding.  The problem with this is that it will pull all of your images away from the sides of the table.

Notice the image near to to of this page with the words "Science and Technology" across it.  I wanted that image pressed against the cell walls of the table.  I didn't want gaps.  Now you might ask, how did I get the text you are reading moved from the left as it is?  The answer is: Tables inside tables.  There is an outer table for this webpage but inside there is a single cell table with padding set at 7 pixels.  The "Science and Technology" image is outside the padded cell.

The above image demonstrates how I am able to keep the text from touching the table that holds the iPod image and sub-text. The inner table consists of two cells.  I chose a gray background for the lower cell and white text.  The border of the inner table is the same color as the background of the lower cell.  These characteristics can be specified by right mouse clicking the table or cell and choosing either table or cell properties.

Do you see the dotted line around the table.  That is a table with a border size of zero.  I also collapse the border. 
 

Here is a screen shot of the front page table dialog box:

We have discussed padding and border size.  The outer table of this webpage had a padding of zero with zero border size.  But when I place images inside the page I will usually place the image in a table to keep the image from touching the text.  These tables are inside another table to keep the text from touching the gray border on the left.  I will pad that table 7 pixels, pulling the text from the edges. 

We will discuss image properties and aesthetics in a future article.

 

 

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By Dan Wilson
Best Syndication Staff Writer

Microsoft FrontPage Books
 

Keywords and misspellings:  MS Microsoft Front Page FrontPage tables tabels sells imajes imaje webpages links hiperlinks hiperlink


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Copyright 2005 Best Syndication                                            Last Updated Saturday, July 10, 2010 09:45 PM