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Study shows Convenience Foods and Eating out Bad for Childrenís Heart

November 15th, 2005

Study shows Convenience Foods and Eating out Bad for Childrenís Heart

Process of Clogged Arteries

A study that was focused around 759 participants were surveyed for diet and exercise regiments.  Of these, 621 completed the surveys, and researchers examined the results to see if there was a cardiovascular disease increase risk if kids ate outside the home.


The studyís author Karen Olson, R.N., executive director of the Cardiovascular Research and Education Foundation in Wausau, Wisconsin said "As a culture, we say we value physical activity and healthy eating, but in reality we're all about convenience and convenience foods because we have such busy schedules."

 

 

The researchers took a random sampling of students in 2nd, 5th, 8th and 11th grade.  Of these children 40 percent of them had at least one abnormal lipid profile.  The survey they took had reported that 26 percent (126) children ate out four or more times a week, and this did not count the school lunch program. 

 

The researchers compared these children that ate out more than 4 times a week against the 495 that did not eat out that often. 

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They tested blood pressure, as well as lipid tests, and an insulin test for diabetes 2.   The result showed that these frequent restaurant eaters, had higher blood pressure, lower levels of the HDL good cholesterol, and had smaller LDL particle size which contributes to clogged arteries.  The used an insulin sensitivity test called QUICK1 and found that these same children had lower scores on this test which is an early warning for the onset of type-2 diabetes.

"Children who ate out more frequently were not significantly more overweight than their peers who ate out less frequently," Olson said. "But this might just reflect that the dietary patterns have not yet had their full impact on body weight. However, their diets and exercise patterns differed significantly from the children eating at home more often."

The kids that ate at home more often had slightly less sugar, sodium, fat and cholesterol in their diets. 

The researchers donít believe that it is just the restaurants to blame, but the lifestyle of food preparation in the home as well.

"In a 21-meal week, eating out four times shouldn't create the high-sugar, high-sodium, high-fat intake that we saw," Olson said. "We think it's not just the eating out but the way these children are eating all the time, with lots of frozen pizzas and packaged macaroni and cheese on the days they eat at home."

The children that ate out more often drank twice as many diet and regular soft drinks, sugary juice drinks and punch.  The children that ate out more often also were significantly not as active as their peer group.  These children spent 3.59 hours a day in sedentary activities compared with 2.78 hours a day on the kids who ate at home.

"I think what we've tapped into here is a whole different lifestyle," said Bryan Hendricks, Ph.D., of the University of Wisconsin in Madison who was the study statistician for this project.

"As a culture, we say we value physical activity and healthy eating, but in reality we're all about convenience and convenience foods because we have such busy schedules," Olson said.

 

By Nicole Wilson
Best Syndication Staff Writer

 

Keywords and misspellings:  CVD risk for children heart disease Type 2 diabites plaque in artery heart disease diet fast food convinence food


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Copyright 2005 Best Syndication                                            Last Updated Saturday, July 10, 2010 09:46 PM