Health

Intensive Lifestyle Intervention helped to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Weighing in - BSN

(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found that overweight type-2 diabetes patients increased their chances of partial and complete remission with intensive lifestyle intervention. The results, which showed modest remission rates, were reported in the December 19, 2012 issue of JAMA.

Many people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes wonder if the disease is reversible. Diabetes is thought of as a disease that is progressive that will eventually lead to vascular and neuropathic damage. Other studies involving bariatric surgery on type 2 diabetes patients suggested that some cases could be resolved. There were no studies on the rate of remission with lifestyle modifications alone. This prompted Edward W. Gregg, Ph.D., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, and his colleagues to investigate.

Aerobic Exercise is best at Fat Burning and Weight Loss

Credit: National Cancer Institute Bill Branson (Photographer) - PD

(Best Syndication News) - Duke researchers found aerobic exercise offered optimum fat burning and weight loss compared to weight lifting (resistance training), or a combination of the two exercises. The study results were reported in the December 15, 2012 issue of the Journal of Applied Physiology.

To investigate, researchers conducted a randomized trial with 234 overweight and obese adults. The participants were randomly assigned to a resistance group, an aerobic group, or a combination of resistance and aerobic exercise group.

Women who Smoke were at a higher Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

Stethoscope - BSN

(Best Syndication News) - Women who smoke moderately are at a significantly higher risk than non-smokers to succumb to sudden cardiac death, according to a new study. The researchers reported their findings in the American Heart Association Journal, Circulation: Arrhythmia & Electrophysiology.

The risk factor for sudden cardiac death may even be higher in women who have smoked for a long time. However, over time, the risk factor could be reduced or eliminated by quitting the habit.

The study’s lead author, Roopinder K. Sandhu, M.D., M.P.H., a cardiac electrophysiologist at the University of Alberta's Mazankowski Heart Institute in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, said that previous research has identified the risk for sudden cardiac death. In this new research, they wanted to determine the risk factor based on the quantity and duration of smoking. Sandhu and colleagues wanted to compare the risk factor to healthy women.

Calorie Counting and Activity Tracking Mobile App helped with Weight Loss

Credit: National Cancer Institute Daniel Sone (Photographer) - PD

(Best Syndication News) - People lost an average of 15 pounds when they used a mobile phone app to track calories and physical activity during a study conducted by researchers from Northwestern University. The study results were published in the online first edition of the December 10, 2012 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The researchers point out that the mobile app was only partly responsible for the weight loss; the participants also attended regular classes that educated them about proper nutrition and exercise. The study also found that the people participating in the study were able to keep the weight off for more than one year.

Menopause combined with obesity and overeating encourages Breast Cancer Tumor Growth

Woman eating - BSN

(Best Syndication News) - Using a rat model, researchers investigated breast tumor growth associated with menopause, obesity and overeating. The rat model demonstrated the potential increased risk for breast-cancer tumor growth and progression with post-menopausal women who are obese and overeat. The results were published in the American Association for Cancer Research journal, Cancer Research.

Paul S. MacLean, Ph.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center in Aurora, Colorado explained that obese post-menopausal women are at an increased risk for developing breast cancer and for having less desirable clinical outcomes.

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