Aging and Longevity

Dr. Oz Anti-aging Hot List – Four products that help you look younger

eye - BSN

(Best Syndication News) - Doctor Oz gave a list of products that he said will help to make you look younger on yesterday’s ‘Dr. Oz’ TV show. He said that he did not receive any money to recommending these products and said that each product has been clinically proven to reduce the signs of aging. Three of the four products on his hotlist were cosmetic wrinkle prevention routines and one would protect the skin against UV damage.

The Dr. Oz Anti-aging Hot List:

1. The Clarisonic Opal Sonic Infusion System – For just one minute a day and 100 percent in the research saw improvements. The system costs around $185. The micro massager is applied to the crows feet around the eye along with a special serum.

Dr. Oz discusses how to live to be 100 using a Life Expectancy Calculator questionnaire

Dr. Oz discusses how to live to be 100 using a Life Expectancy Calculator questionnaire

Best Syndication News

(Best Syndication News) - Dr. Oz had a segment called “So you want to live forever?” on his TV show yesterday. Dr. Thomas Perls came from Boston University School of Medicine to help explain how you can live to be 100 years old. Dr. Perls studies centenarians. Dr. Oz explained the women live on average to 81 years of age in the United States.

Perls has a Life Expectancy Calculator to help figure out how long a person can live and the things that people can change to increase there chances of living to 100. Some of those things are your attitude, exercise, challenging your brain, eating right, not smoking, and not being overweight. Also if you have a close blood relative that lived over 90 years old you gain some years. Here is what they discussed on the show concerning the Life Expectancy Calculator.

Dr. Oz said that every woman starts with a base age of 89 years. So enter that in 89 into a calculator. From then on you add or take away years or keep them the same depending on the question.

Shingles Vaccine Zostavax approved for 50 to 59 year old people

Shingles Vaccine Zostavax approved for 50 to 59 year old people

Best Syndication News

(Best Syndication News) - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) extended the approval for the Zostavax shingles vaccine to allow for people ranging between 50 and 59 years old to receive the preventive treatment. Previously the shingles vaccine was only approved for people 60 years and older which originally gained FDA approval on May 26, 2006. The Zostavax shingles vaccine is manufactured by Merck & Co. Inc.

Shingles is caused from the varicella-zoster virus and is also the same virus that causes Chickenpox. The person that had Chickenpox has the virus remain dormant in some of the body's nerves. Many years later, usually in old age the virus can re-emerge in the form of shingles. The elderly and those with a weakened immune system are more likely to develop shingles.

Eating a high-fiber diet associated with reduced death risk

Eating a high-fiber diet associated with reduced death risk

National Cancer Institute - PD

(Best Syndication News) - Eating a diet with adequate amounts of fiber can reduce a person's risk for death from cardiovascular, infectious and respiratory disease, or from any cause said a recent study published in the June 14th print issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Foods high in fiber include legumes, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.

Researcher, Yikyung Park, Sc.D., of the National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Md., along with his colleagues analyzed nutritional survey data collected from 219,123 men and 168,999 women in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. The researchers compared the fiber intake reported in the survey between 1995 and 1996 and with the deaths that were reported on average of nine years later on a follow-up survey.

Middle age women reduced cardiovascular disease by lowering high blood pressure

Middle age women reduced cardiovascular disease by lowering high blood pressure

Best Syndication News

(Best Syndication News) - Previous research has found that having high blood pressure is associated with increased risk of heart disease. However a recent study with middle-aged women showed that by lowering high blood pressure they also reduced their risk for developing cardiovascular disease more so than the men in the study. The research findings were reported in the Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association.

Cardiovascular disease includes stroke, heart attack, and heart failure. This large study involved researchers from 11 countries throughout Europe, Asia, and South America who took part of the International Database on Ambulatory blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes (IDACO). This large data collection included 9,357 adults averaging 53 year old with 47 percent being women from countries around the world. The participants were studied over 11 years or longer for cardiovascular disease and measurements of systolic blood pressure.

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