Investing

The Stock Market - A Brief Primer - Investors Investing

The Stock Market - A Brief Primer - Investors Investing

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For most people, the stock market is a scary thought because they have seen the devastating effects it can have when things go wrong. Stock plummeted after Enron, and even when mergers are announced as with the case of Chase and Bank One, the stock market feels the effects. Even DuPont has seen its stock prices drop when negative information is publicized, so the stock market, for the most part, is a fickle entity.

How does a new investor avoid the pitfalls of the stock market? Research is the only way, and it’s no ironclad guarantee. That means before you invest, you adopt the habit or reading the NYSE and DOW reports in the daily newspapers as well as reading the business section of the newspaper for any reports that may affect the stock prices of a company you may be considering.

Sweden’s Jordan Fund Finds Uranium Dream Team

Sweden’s Jordan Fund Finds Uranium Dream Team

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(Editor’s Note: StockInterview.com encourages Guest Commentary. Recently, Sweden’s Jordan Fund contacted us about writing a feature on Powertech Uranium. We had interviewed Richard Clements this past summer about his company’s plans in New Mexico and elsewhere, and had reported upon it. The Jordan Fund staff graciously updated us on the company’s progress, the presentation of which you can find in the following article. Sweden’s Jordan Fund is not a mutual fund, but a collective network formed many years ago by Mr. Nisse Sandberg. The founder had studied with the late Adolph Lundin and passed along his knowledge of the natural resource to this group’s members. Because this is a guest commentary, StockInterview.com can not endorse this article’s opinions. Below is the result of the Jordan Fund’s latest research.)

Avoiding Suspicious Activity Reports In Cash Transactions

Avoiding Suspicious Activity Reports In Cash Transactions

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Many people ask "just what is considered illegal or suspicious activity when moving cash?" Some people have gone to the bank with the cash proceeds of a garage sale or a car sale on the weekend, and recounted horror stories of multiple questions by bank employees and have sometimes been reported to the government as suspected criminals.

The reality is that such reporting is very plausible. Most western countries have enacted cash transaction legislation that mandates it. In Australia, anything over $10,000 must be reported to regulators, and any amount under that that bank staff deem suspicious. Likewise in the U.S. So, if you’re unusually scruffy-looking and wander into a bank with $4,000 cash to deposit, it’s very possible you will be reported by the teller. (See our article Money Laundering Defined on the web site www.powerprivacy.com for details on U.S. Currency Transfer Reports, or CTRs.)

DOING ALL THE RIGHT THINGS…FOR THE WRONG REASONS: The lessons to business of Tammy Faye and Jim Bakker

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As a former CEO of a publicly-traded company, I have watched the emerging revelations of corporate wrongdoing with more than a passing interest. While filled with the same revulsion shared by many to the immoral, illegal and greedy actions of some companies and their leaders, I am also concerned that we not overreact and undercut an economic system that is clearly the best in the world. The fault, my dear readers, is not with the system, but with an abuse of the system. We should also be careful to differentiate between the greedy abuse of the system and the criminal act of looting a company.

As I read attacks on stock options and other forms of incentive compensation, my thoughts parallel the arguments of gun advocates who say, “Guns don’t kill. People kill.” Stock options don’t harm shareholders, greedy people do. Inhibiting or eliminating stock options and other forms of incentive compensation plans will make it more difficult for the greedy to gain, but such action will also reduce the incentive for employees to add to shareholder value. There is nothing wrong with trying to maximize corporate profits, the problem lies in doing it with lies.

Cheat To Win and the Warren Buffett Memo

Cheat To Win and the Warren Buffett Memo

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Did you ever have that experience of reading a book or a newspaper article that so closely parallels your own thinking, or your own writing, that you might have a doppelgänger out there someplace you never knew about?

Well, that’s the feeling that swept over me when I reader Warren Buffet’s recent memo about peer pressure and monkey-do, monkey-say corporate behavior. It was as if Buffet had torn Chapter 14 from my book, Cheat To Win, and reprinted it as his own.

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