Cancer

Menopause combined with obesity and overeating encourages Breast Cancer Tumor Growth

Woman eating - BSN

(Best Syndication News) - Using a rat model, researchers investigated breast tumor growth associated with menopause, obesity and overeating. The rat model demonstrated the potential increased risk for breast-cancer tumor growth and progression with post-menopausal women who are obese and overeat. The results were published in the American Association for Cancer Research journal, Cancer Research.

Paul S. MacLean, Ph.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center in Aurora, Colorado explained that obese post-menopausal women are at an increased risk for developing breast cancer and for having less desirable clinical outcomes.

Menopause Hormone Replacement Therapy reduced Heart Failure and Heart Attack Risk

Stethoscope - BSN

(Best Syndication News) - A study found that women who took hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for ten years had a reduced risk for heart failure and heart attack compared to women who did not take the therapy. The positive effects of taking HRT therapy appears to be a reduction in cardiovascular disease, but on the negative side, there is an increased risk for developing breast cancer. The new study suggests that the cardiovascular benefits are present without having an increased risk for cancer, deep vein thrombosis, or stroke.

The randomized trial-study was conducted in Denmark over a ten-year period. The researchers had followed-up after an additional six years to assess if HRT reduced heart disease risk if therapy started soon after menopause.

CDC suggests that all Baby Boomers be tested for Hepatitis C

Stethoscope - BSN

(Best Syndication News) - The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is recommending that all baby boomers in the country be tested once for the hepatitis C virus. The CDC estimates that 1-in-30 baby boomers are infected with hepatitis C and may not even be aware that they are infected. Baby boomers are people who were born between 1945 and 1965.

The CDC said that hepatitis C can cause the liver to become seriously diseased and in some cases, it could lead to liver cancer. The fastest growing rate for cancer related death is liver cancer. In the US, hepatitis C is also a leading cause for liver transplants.

Over 3,000 cases of Melanoma Skin Cancer in Europe associated with Sunbed Use

Melanoma skin cancer- credit: National Cancer Institute unknown photographer - PD

(Best Syndication News) - A European study estimates that 5.4 percent of all new cases of cutaneous melanoma skin cancer are related to the use of sunbed tanners. People who use sunbeds to get a golden tan are at a 20 percent increased risk of getting skin cancer compared to those that never used one. The skin cancer risk more than doubles if they used sunbeds before age 35.

Researchers from the International Prevention Research Institute in France, along with the European Institute of Oncology of Italy, wanted to learn more about the relationship between sunbed use and melanoma skin cancer in the Western European region. The researchers investigated and analyzed information gathered in 27 different studies on skin cancer and sunbed use between 1981 and 2012. The participants included people from the UK, France, and Germany.

Pancreatic Cancer risk reduced with higher dietary intake of Vitamin C, E, and Selenium

credit: National Cancer Institute Daniel Sone (Photographer) - PD

(Best Syndication News) - A study found that eating foods with adequate amounts of antioxidant vitamins C, E, and selenium decreased the risk of developing pancreatic cancer by up to two thirds. The researchers reported their findings in the online edition of the journal Gut.

The researchers suggest that one in 12 cases of pancreatic cancer might be preventable. Worldwide, over 250,000 people will die from pancreatic cancer each year. Only 3 percent of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer survive past five years. Other risk factors that are believed to increase the risk for pancreatic cancer include smoking, genetics, and type 2 diabetes. Previously diet was suspected to be a factor.

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