Child Health

Teens are at risk for being overweight as Young Adults if they Skip Breakfast

Teens are at risk for being overweight as Young Adults if they Skip Breakfast

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Eating your breakfast may not be the most inspiring and delightful meal of the day and you may just not feel like eating as hurry up to get out the door in the morning. However, researchers have found yet again, that eating breakfast are one of the most important meals of the day and can help keep you slim and trim. Teenagers that skip breakfast have shown that they are more likely to eat more fast food meals when they enter into adulthood and eat breakfast less often. This usually ends up with the young adult becoming overweight. The study was first reported in the December 2006 issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

The researchers at The Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center at The Miriam Hospital and Brown Medical School analyzed data of over 20,000 adolescents from Add Health which studied adolescents from grades 7 through 12 in the United States. The researchers used data was collected in two waves. The first wave was a total of 9,919 students and the second wave was the same students ranging in age from 11 to 21 from April to August of 1996. The third wave was collected from these same students who now ranged in age from 18 to 27 years of age from August 2001 to April 2002. At each of the waves the participants were questioned about fast food consumption and whether they ate breakfast or not. They were also measured for their body mass index (BMI) rating which helps to determine if they are overweight.

Adults eat more Fat when Living with Children

Adults eat more Fat when Living with Children

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Adults living with children tend to eat considerably more saturated fat than those adults without children. Researchers from the University of Iowa and University of Michigan Health System study equate the extra saturated fat consumption as if the adult were to eat an entire frozen pepperoni pizza extra each and every week. The study will be published in the January 4th, 2007 online edition of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine.

This study turns the table and looks at how possibly children can affect adults in eating behaviors. Most studies focus on how adults form children’s dietary habits.

"The analysis shows that adults' fat intake, particularly saturated fat, is higher for those who live with children compared to adults who don't live with children," said Helena Laroche, M.D., an associate in internal medicine and pediatrics at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine and the study's primary author.

Paxil Birth Defect Litigation - Battle of the Decade

Paxil Birth Defect Litigation - Battle of the Decade

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A year ago, the FDA reclassified Paxil from a Category C drug to a Category D for pregnant women. Category C is for drugs that have been shown to harm the fetus in animals. Category D means a drug has been found to harm the human fetus.

In a December 1, 2006, news release, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee on Obstetric Practice, advised that Paxil should be avoided "by pregnant women or women planning to become pregnant due to the potential risk of fetal heart defects, newborn persistent pulmonary hypertension, and other negative effects."

An interesting comment in the announcement states: "Unpublished data regarding the use of Paxil® during the first trimester of pregnancy have raised concerns about an increased risk of congenital heart malformations."

Survey– Fewer Teens Using Illegal Drugs But Turning To Legal Drugs Like OxyContin and Vicodin – High School Smoking Alcohol Down

Survey– Fewer Teens Using Illegal Drugs But Turning To Legal Drugs Like OxyContin and Vicodin – High School Smoking Alcohol Down

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The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) says that fewer teens are using illegal drugs, but more are using legal drugs, such as pain killers and opiods. In a survey titled “The 2006 Monitoring the Future” (MTF), found that the use of illicit drugs by 8th, 10th and 12th graders has dropped 23.2 percent since 2001 (from 19.4 percent in 2001 to 14.9 percent in 2006).

They say that the use of marijuana has declined “significantly” since 2005. Since 2001, past-month use of marijuana for all three grades combined decreased by almost 25 percent (from 16.6 percent in 2001 to 12.5 percent in 2006). Alcohol and tobacco consumption are also down.

Childhood disease risk may be reduce by limiting Sugary Drinks - Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, Heart Disease, and Diabetes

Childhood disease risk may be reduce by limiting Sugary Drinks - Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome, Heart Disease, and Diabetes

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More adolescents are showing more symptoms of heart disease and diabetes even before they become an adult. A longitudinal study suggest that children can benefit and help avoid these disease later in life if the reduce their sugary drink consumption. The study was first reported in the December issue of the Journal of American Academy of Pediatrics.

"Research on obesity and associated problems such as hypertension and type-2 diabetes has largely dealt with adults," says Alison Ventura, doctoral candidate at Penn State's Center for Childhood Obesity Research. "But with increasing rates of obesity in children, we are seeing these problems at much younger ages."

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