Child Health

Ear Drops Better Than Pills Or Liquid Antibiotics For Ear Infections – Kids With Tubes Fare Better and Quicker With Topic Drops

Ear Drops Better Than Pills Or Liquid Antibiotics For Ear Infections – Kids With Tubes Fare Better and Quicker With Topic Drops

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Researchers say that antibiotic ear drops work faster and better than their oral counterparts for ear infections. After evaluating 80 children ages 6 through 12, Texas scientists say that there is a “growing body of evidence” that supports the use of ear drops over pills.

They said that antibiotic ear drops performed better and faster in treating middle ear infections in children with ear tubes than merely taking oral antibiotics such as swallowing a pill or liquid. Dr. Peter Roland said "With the use of ear drops, you can put more potent medicine just where you need it." Roland is the chairman of otolaryngology at UT (University of Texas) Southwestern and one of the study’s authors.

Autism and Oxytocin

Autism and Oxytocin

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Oxytocin is a nine amino acid peptide produced in the brain and released by the pituitary gland. It is produced in the body naturally, by both males and females, and plays a role in reproduction and may even contribute to those feelings we call "love."

Recent research has linked oxytocin with the ability to trust others. Evidence suggests that it may even play a major role in a person's ability to take care of others and for avoiding conflict.

It's been demonstrated in animals that oxytocin acting within the brain plays a major role in establishing maternal behavior, as scientists put oxytocin into the ventricles of the brains of virgin rats and non-pregnant sheep, and it rapidly induced maternal behavior.

Low Self-Esteem in Children may Create Materialistic Demands – Young Teens highest Risk

Low Self-Esteem in Children may Create Materialistic Demands – Young Teens highest Risk

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Christmas can be a wonderful time of the year for children, but parents may be frustrated at the demands of their children for the best and latest toys, clothes, and electronics. Instead of giving into every demand, this research study might add insight as to ways to mold and change your child self-esteem in the years to come to deflect some of these demands.

Researchers from the University of Illinois and the University of Minnesota found that depending on the age of the child and also if they had low self-esteem, were more likely to be materialistic at Christmas. You can read the complete study in the upcoming issue of the Journal of Consumer Research, and is titled, "Growing up in a Material World: Age Differences in Materialism in Children and Adolescents."

Infants Car Safety Seats – Don’t leave Baby to Sleep Unattended

Infants Car Safety Seats – Don’t leave Baby to Sleep Unattended

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Life threatening events have been reported with babies that sleep in infant car safety seats for extended period of time. This was first reported in the BMJ Volume 333 pp 1205-6. This doesn’t mean that infant car safety seats are not safe, they are vital for protecting young infants from injury and death in motor vehicle accidents.

If you leave your child to sleep in an infant baby car seat, a baby could be at risk of oxygen de-saturation and apnoea (temporary suspension of breathing).

Researchers from New Zealand researched nine infants from ages 3 days to 6 months that have been left to sleep restrained in a car safety seat. When the event really occurred before the study they were described as as "blue," "scrunched up" and "not breathing.” In the recreation they were able to easily able to recreate the cause in the infants own car seats because the infant’s head was leaning forward and was causing the airway to be obstructed from breathing.

ADHD – Friendship Clinic is Making Friends easier for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Children

ADHD – Friendship Clinic is Making Friends easier for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Children

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Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often have tremendous problems making friends. The children also have a slew of other problems that are usually well known with learning problems in school. A clinical study is trying out a Friendship Clinic for ADHD children and their parents to educate them how to make a friend.

"Children with ADHD often are peer-rejected, and their difficulties multiply as they grow to adulthood," said Amori Yee Mikami, assistant professor of psychology and principal investigator for this new clinical study.

"Children with ADHD often grow up with depression and relationship problems, some may develop criminal behavior and substance abuse problems," Mikami said. "There can be a spiral of failure that is partly the result of not having learned to make and keep friends as children."

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