Child Health

Teenage Girls gain more Weight with Frequent Weighing on Scale – Risk for Eating Disorders and Obesity

Teenage Girls gain more Weight with Frequent Weighing on Scale – Risk for Eating Disorders and Obesity

Stock Photo

A study by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health found that teenage girls that weighed themselves often were more likely to become binge eaters and also at an increased risk for developing an eating disorder and becoming obese. The study was first published in the December issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

The study found that these girls were not benefiting from the frequent weigh-ins on the bathroom scale. They were more likely to skip meals, smoke cigarettes, take diet pills, use laxative and vomit. These bad dieting habits could lead to eating disorders such as bulimia or anorexia. These girls were also at an increased risk for becoming obese. The study found that the girls that weighed themselves frequently gained twice as much weight compared to those girls that did not weigh-in often.

Violent Video Games Shut Down Teenagers Reasoning while Increasing Emotional Arousal

Violent Video Games Shut Down Teenagers Reasoning while Increasing Emotional Arousal

Stock Photo

Adolescents that played violent video games had a lasting effect on the way their brain worked. They had a sustained increase in activity in the area of the brain that is responsible for emotional arousal. The teens also had a decrease in activity in the area of the brain that is used in executive function which is related to control, focus, and concentration. The study was first presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

"Our study suggests that playing a certain type of violent video game may have different short-term effects on brain function than playing a nonviolent—but exciting—game," said Vincent P. Mathews, M.D., professor of radiology at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis.

Parenting Teenagers – Teen Eating Disorders

Parenting Teenagers – Teen Eating Disorders

Stock Photo

Eating disorders have long been a serious problem among people of all ages. However, this disease usually begins somewhere in the pre-teen stages of life, and although many adolescent boys suffer with this disorder, it usually affects and is much more severe in young girls.

People who do suffer from an eating disorder like to place blame on factors such as television and family life-styles. Although these situations do influence eating disorders, the basis for this disease lies within the person whom it is affecting.

Most girls and boys who suffer from an eating disorder usually are unhappy with themselves and their own performance in life. With girls, eating disorders may arise if they do not succeed in activities such as cheerleading or gymnastics, or if they do not seem to attract the attention of boys. Many girls believe that they cannot be beautiful unless they are thin, sometimes due to naturally thin girls that surround them both in real life and in fashion. For boys, causes may also result from sports that are weight orientated like wrestling.

Sleep Breathing Disorders - Overweight Children could be helped in 25 Percent of cases with Exercise

Sleep Breathing Disorders - Overweight Children could be helped in 25 Percent of cases with Exercise

Stock Photo

Physical activity may be able to help 25 out of 100 overweight children that have tested positive for sleep-disordered breathing. A study recently published in the November issue of Obesity studied 100 children that were overweight and had sleep breathing problems and found that increasing physical activity helped improve their sleeping.

The children reduced there sleep breathing disorders by half and for those in the study that exercised the most, had an 80 percent reduction in breathing problems while sleeping.

Childhood Obesity - Exercise is lacking because of watching TV and Playing Video Games

Childhood Obesity - Exercise is lacking because of TV watching and Playing Video Games

Stock Photo

Researchers from the University of Toronto found that one of the best ways to improve a child’s health is by limiting watching TV and playing video games as these activities take away time from physical activity. Bad habits from childhood become bad habits as adults. This study was first reported in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

"Because television is so commonplace in our society, we don't realize how much of an impact it has on youth," said co-author Professor Ken Allison of the department of public health sciences and principal investigator in the physical activity research program. "We need to be reminded that it is crucial to turn them off in order to establish healthy and active patterns in childhood and adolescence that will remain with individuals into adulthood."

Syndicate content
Share/Save/Bookmark

      

Post to Facebook

Important: The material on Best Syndication is for informational purposes only and is not meant to be advice. Authors may have or will receive monetary compensation from the company's product/s mentioned. You should always seek professional advice before making any legal, financial or medical decisions and this website cannot substitute or replace any trained professional consultation.
Use of this site means that you agree to our TERMS OF SERVICE

Advertise On This Site
Copyright © 2006-2015 By Best Syndication All Rights Reserved