Child Health

Children are increasingly fatter in the Waist

Children are increasingly fatter in the Waist

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Belly fat is one of the most dangerous places to store fat as it increase a person’s risk of developing a number of potentially deadly diseases. According to a recent study published in today’s Pediatrics children have become increasing obese in the abdomen by 65 percent more when comparing children from 1988 to children in 2004.

Waist measurement is increasingly being recognized a predictor for future health problems, even more so than Body Mass Index (BMI). The larger your waistline you increase your chances of developing cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. If a child has the increasing belly fat, however, the researchers say that by losing weight and changing their lifestyle that many of these conditions could be prevented and the damage could be reversible if they haven’t developed any disease.

Head Lice – Special Hairdryer Device can Kill Infestation in one Treatment

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A prototype of the LouseBuster developed by University of Utah researchers.

Drying out your scalp may be the secret weapon to killing a head lice infestation. A new device called the LouseBuster was invented by University of Utah biologists. This hairdryer device is a chemical-free treatment that will prevent the eggs or “nits” from reproducing. The study of the LouseBuster was first published in the November issue of the journal Pediatrics.

"It is particularly effective because it kills louse eggs, which chemical treatments have never done very well," says Dale Clayton, a University of Utah biology professor who led the research and co-invented the machine. "It also kills hatched lice well enough to eliminate entire infestations. It works in one 30-minute treatment. The chemical treatments require multiple applications one to two weeks apart."

Brain Stem Defect May Be Cause of SIDS – Serotonin Regulation Could Help Explain Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

Brain Stem Defect May Be Cause of SIDS – Serotonin Regulation Could Help Explain Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

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New research suggests that an abnormality in the brainstem which regulates breathing, blood pressure, body heat, and arousal, may be the cause of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The American SIDS Institute says placing babies to sleep on their back even though they sleep more soundly on their stomach and the use of firm mattresses can reduce SIDS risk.

Researchers examined brain autopsy specimens from 31 infants who had died from SIDS and 10 who had died acutely from other causes. After examining the lowest part of the brainstem, known as the medulla oblongata, they found abnormalities in nerve cells that make and use serotonin, one of over 100 chemicals in the brain that transmit messages from one nerve cell to another.

Asthma Attacks could be reduced with Exposure to Sunlight

Asthma Attacks could be reduced with Exposure to Sunlight

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Researchers from Australia found a connection with exposure to ultraviolet light and the reduction of asthma symptoms. The research team from Perth’s Telethon Institute for Child Health Research studied how ultraviolet sunlight would help mice that had asthma-like symptoms including inflamed airways and lungs.

The mice that were exposed to ultraviolet light for 15 to 30 minutes before being exposed to allergens had significantly reduced asthma-like symptoms. The researchers believe that the UV exposure helps to produce a cell type that can help prevent the asthma-like symptoms.

Associate Professor Prue Hart, leader of the research team, which includes Dr Debra Turner, Dr Shelley Gorman and PhD student Jacqueline McGlade, all reported positive results and potential treatments in the future for asthmatics.

Deafness - Gene for Hearing is Necessary to Deliver Audio to the Brain

Deafness - Gene for Hearing is Necessary to Deliver Audio to the Brain

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Researchers have previously pinpointed a gene that contributes to human deafness, but now they have more understanding as to how the molecular process works in the inner ear to send the audio to the brain. The study was first reported in the October 20th issue of the journal Cell.

First the researchers discovered that mice that lacked the gene otoferlin were profoundly deaf. This deafness was caused by an inability for the ear to translate the sounds into a chemical nerve messenger which would then pass the sound to the auditory nerves and then on to the brain.

"Study of the genes responsible for deafness can bring new insight into the molecular basis of how hearing works," said Christine Petit of the Institut Pasteur in Paris, France.

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