Food and Nutrition

Amino acid - Benefits and its functions

Amino acid- Benefits and its functions

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The amino acid is an organic acid in which one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by NH2 group. It is one of the organic compounds, which represent the end product of the protein breakdown. All proteins are made up of amino acids. An amino acid contains a carbon atom, a free among group (containing nitrogen-NH2) and a carboxyl group (COOH). Amino acids are amphoteric in reaction and form salts with both acids and bases. The amino acids in the body are derivatives of saturated fatty acids. Amino acids are colourless, crystalline substance, soluble in water, easily diffusible and (except glycine) optically active. When the amino and carboxyl groups of amino acids combine acid residues. A peptide thus consists of 2 or more amino acid residues linked by peptide bonds.

Manganese- Benefits, Dosage, Deficiency, Sources

Manganese- Benefits, Dosage, Deficiency, Sources

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The correction of bone deformity in poultry with manganese was discovered in 1936 by Norris and Lyons. Later studies in 1961 by Hurley and Everson pronounced importance of manganese in growth, bone development, reproduction, and central nervous system.

The human body contains 10-20 mg of manganese, and is widely distributed in body specially in intestinal track, liver and reproductive organs. It absorption and excretion is on similar lines as of Iron. It is stored in the blood and liver. The serum manganese level gets raised following a heat attack. The defence mechanism of body on manganese. It is excreted in the faeces, which gets enhanced with high calcium intakes. The urine has only traces of it.

Iron functions and deficiency

Iron functions and deficiency

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Functions on the Body: Iron is generally absorbed from the whole of the gastro intestinal tract but most of it comes from the upper part of the small intestine mainly the duodenum. Dietary Iron is absorbed through the mucosal cells in ferrous form. Iron in diet is present in ferric state which is reduced to ferrous during absorption, with the help of Vitamin C, glutathione and amino acid –SH groups. After entering the mucosal cell in ferrous form, the iron molecules are soon reconverted into ferric state, which combine with a protein, apoferritin of the mucosal cells to form ferritin. Such ferritin is one of the storage forms of iron in the tissues, which passes into the blood. This ferritn iron gets reduced into ferrous from with the help of Vitamin C and enters the blood stream. After entering the blood stream this ferrous iron is re-oxidised into ferric from unde the catalytic action of copper-binding protein ceruloplasmin, and combines with iron binding globulin transferrin or iderophilin of the plasma. Thus the Transferrin iron complex is the transport form of iron of the plasma and is carried to the different tissues of the body. The protein-bound iron in the plasma per 100 ml is about 120-140 mcg in males, and 90-120 mcg in females. The total iron-binding capacity is about 300-360 mcg per 100 ml in both sexes.

Classification of Amino Acids

Classification of Amino Acids

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Though 300 amino acids occur in nature, about 20 amino acids are found in proteins. All the amino acids are required by the body but some are known as indispensable nutritionally essential amino acids, as these cannot be synthesized in the body, and their deficiency disturbs nitrogen equilibrium, growth, nutrition, maintenance, and life span. The others are termed as dispensable in the diet as there amino acids can be synthesized in the body, but they are more important to the cell than the essential ones.

There are 10 essential amino acids in humans: Arginine, Histidine, Isoleucine, Leucine, Lysine, Methionine, Phenylalanine, Threonine, Tryptophan, and Valine. Arginine and Histidine are considered nutritionally semiessential, since they can be synthesized but not in quantities sufficient to permit normal growth. Two other amino acids, Cysteine and Tyrosine may be formed form the essential amino acids Methionine and Phenylalanine, respectively.

Dr. Oz visits on Oprah TV Show – discusses new book “You on a Diet”

Dr. Oz visits on Oprah TV Show – discusses new book “You on a Diet”

You: On a Diet: The Owner's Manual for Waist Management [AUDIOBOOK] (Audio CD)
by Michael F. Roizen (Narrator), Mehmet C. Oz (Narrator)

Dr. Oz and co-author Dr. Rozen have released a new book called “You on a Diet” and visited today on the Oprah TV show about ways that you can changer your lifestyle to help you lose weight.

Dr. Oz told Oprah that your health has to do with your waistline, even more than how much you weigh. If you stomach measures over 32 ½ inches for a women, or over 35 inches for a man then you are to heavy. This excess fat around your waist is hurting your health. You could have fat thighs and a small waist and even though you might be overweight it is not going to hurt your health as much.

Dr. Oz and Dr. Roizen have compiled successful books to help people with improving your health. Their first book “You the Owners Manual” put these doctors on the bestsellers lists at the book store. Now, with their new book, “You on a Diet” the doctor’s teams up again to tackle the tough subject on helping people maintain a healthy body weight. In this book, they discuss how your body works biologically to win at losing weight.

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