Weight Loss

Menopause combined with obesity and overeating encourages Breast Cancer Tumor Growth

Woman eating - BSN

(Best Syndication News) - Using a rat model, researchers investigated breast tumor growth associated with menopause, obesity and overeating. The rat model demonstrated the potential increased risk for breast-cancer tumor growth and progression with post-menopausal women who are obese and overeat. The results were published in the American Association for Cancer Research journal, Cancer Research.

Paul S. MacLean, Ph.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center in Aurora, Colorado explained that obese post-menopausal women are at an increased risk for developing breast cancer and for having less desirable clinical outcomes.

A Low Fat Diet can aid Weight Loss without Trying

Credit: National Cancer Institute Len Rizzi (Photographer) - PD

(Best Syndication News) - Researchers from the University of East Anglia found that reducing the amount of fat in a person’s diet could help them lose around three-and-one-half pounds without reducing their food intake. In addition to slimming down, the participants had shown reductions in their “bad” LDL cholesterol levels. The study trial results were published in the British Medical Journal.

The weight loss occurred when the person was picking low-fat foods. The report was commissioned by the World Health Organization (WHO) Nutrition Guidance Expert Advisory Group (NUGAG) Subgroup on Diet and Health to determine if their recommendations for total fat intake were up-to-date.


Childhood Obesity risk factor can be calculated at Birth

Credit: National Cancer Insitute (photographer unknown) - PD

(Best Syndication News) - Researchers have devised a method to calculate a baby’s chance of becoming obese during childhood. The risk factor is determined by the baby’s birth weight, the parent’s body mass index (BMI), how many people live in the household, the mother’s professional status, and if she smoked during pregnancy. The study was published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

The researchers developed this method to identify risk factors by analyzing information from 4,000 children in Finland that were followed starting in 1986. First, the researchers tried to determine genetic profiles that could predict obesity, but that failed to work. Then they looked at non-genetic information that was collected at the time of birth. The formula they finally developed worked in the Finnish cohort. So they tested the calculations using information collected in the US and Italy. With that data they were able to predict childhood obesity from the risk factors.

Poorer Children at higher risk for becoming Obese

Salad that looks like a face - BSN

(Best Syndication News) - Researcher from Rice University found that children living in poorer neighborhoods were at almost a 30 percent higher risk for becoming obese than children who were living in high-class neighborhoods. Another factor contributing to obesity risk was lower levels of education. The study did not investigate factors such as family composition or individual features.

Rice sociologists Rachel Tolbert Kimbro, director of the Kinder Institute for Urban Research's Urban Health Program, and Justin Denney, associate director of the program, investigated data collected on 17,530 children that were age 5. These children lived in 4,700 different neighborhoods nationwide. The researchers used factors such as socioeconomic status, maternal education, and television watching time to help determine their results.

Mice gained Weight because of inappropriate Eating Times

Weigh in on Bathroom Scale - BSN

(Best Syndiaction News) - Researchers found that changing the time when mice ate caused the animals to gain weight. The study results suggest that there is a relationship between brain clock molecules and fat cell storage. The researchers published their findings in Nature Medicine.

Georgios Paschos PhD, a research associate in the lab of Garret FitzGerald, MD, FRS director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, along with colleagues, studied the effects of deleting the clock gene Arntl (also called Bmal1) in mice. These mice became obese when they changed the time when they normally ate at night.

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