Weight Loss

Health Commissioner of New York City wants Calorie Counting on Restaurant Menus

Health Commissioner of New York City wants Calorie Counting on Restaurant Menus

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Not only is New York City wanting to have restaurants remove the use of Trans fat in their food preparation, but now the city’s health department wants certain restaurants to disclose the calorie count of food on their menus too.

McDonald’s for example may in the near future have to show the price and the calorie count on the menu board hanging on the wall. This would only include restaurants that have standardized portion sizes. Many of these are national fast-food chains, which are already disclosing calorie and nutrition information in a more discreet manor.

Obesity could be attributed to extra Salt Consumption

Obesity could be attributed to extra Salt Consumption

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Salt is being attributed as being a culprit in causing obesity, increasing diseases and shortening lifespan according to a new study recently published in the journal Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases."

Professors, Dr. Heikki Karppanen of the University of Helsinki and Dr. Eero Mervaala of the University of Kuopio from Finland, report health improvements with the reduction of salt intake. They report an average reduction of 30 – 35% salt intake for 30 years for people living in Finland. This reduction of salt showed a large 75 % to 80 % decrease in people under the age of 65 years old, of suffering from a stroke and coronary heart disease mortality. In addition to the decrease of coronary related deaths, there was an increase in life expectancy for males and females by 6 – 7 years.

Obesity – Binge Eating at Restaurants can make you Fat

Obesity – Binge Eating at Restaurants can make you Fat

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Binge eating is one of the contributing factors for becoming obese and overweight. It is commonly believed that most of the binge eating happens in private. A new study funded by a grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research at the National Institute of Health found that another common place for binge eating is found at restaurants.

Binge eating is defined as the uncontrolled consumption of large amount of food without purging. This study focused of understanding how the restaurant environment affects our eating habits with extra large portion sizes along with the increased frequency of dining out. This along with a lack of physical activity may be clues to how obesity is becoming an epidemic in the US.

The Negative Calorie Diet - Can This Be Real?

The Negative Calorie Diet - Can This Be Real?

Foods That Cause You to Lose Weight:: The Negative Calorie Effect (Mass Market Paperback)
by Neal Barnard M.D.

You have probably heard of the Negative Calorie Diet, sometimes referred to as the Catabolic Diet. On the surface, it sounds like a dieters dream. The more you eat, the more weight you lose. Can this be real?

Of course, there is no such thing as a food that contains negative calories. Every food contains calories. The idea behind the Negative Calorie diet is to eat catabolic foods, or negative calorie foods that burn more calories to digest that what they put back.

Surprisingly, strictly based on numbers, this is entirely possible, but it should be noted that there is no scientific evidence to verify it.

For example, if you eat an orange that hypothetically contains 80 calories, you gain 80 calories. But if that same orange uses 110 calories to digest, you lose 30 calories.

Since your body needs 110 calories to digest the orange and the orange only provides 80, where does it get the other 30 calories? It would come from the stored fat in your body.

Weight Loss Pill – Rimonabant (Acomplia) pending FDA approval

Weight Loss Pill – Rimonabant (Acomplia) pending FDA approval

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Acomplia is a modest weight loss drug that suppresses appetite in the brain. Rimonabant (Acomplia) is currently selling in Europe since July and approval is currently pending with the Food and Drug Administration in the US.

The weight loss on average after a year of taking Acomplia was around 11 pounds. If a person continued to take the medication their weight did not come back, while those that were given a placebo after the year gained back their weight.

The study also instructed the participants to follow a “mild” low-calorie diet according to their body weight. The participants that took the higher dose of 20 milligrams had the most significant improvements on their weight, waist circumference, cholesterol levels and blood pressure.

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