Mind

Folate and Vitamin B12 Nutrients are important for Cognitive Ability in seniors

Folate and Vitamin B12 Nutrients are important for Cognitive Ability in seniors

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Two nutrients are important for seniors to help maintain their cognitive function. These nutrients are folate and vitamin B12 and help maintain healthy nerves and blood cells. A study from Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University (USDA HNRCA) reports the seniors that have adequate vitamin B12 and Folate levels performed better on cognitive tests. Those seniors who had low levels of vitamin B12 had more occurrences of cognitive impairments. The study was first published in the January issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Martha Savaria Morris, PhD, researcher and epidemiologist at the USDA HNRCA said, "we found a strong relationship between high folate status and good cognitive function among people 60 and older who also had adequate levels of vitamin B12."

Zyprexa Judge Sends Invite to New York Times Reporter

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The judge in the Zypexa secret document case has sent a New York Times reporter an invitation to attend a hearing in the on-going Eli Lilly fiasco in the US District Court for the Eastern District of New York.

"This invitation,” Judge Jack Weinstein wrote, “is intended to permit Alex Berenson to confront testimony received at a hearing in this court on January 16-17 implicating him in a conspiracy to obtain and publish confidential documents sealed by this court.”

According to Lilly, it took no part in extending this invitation. However, since when does a judge send out invitations, unsolicited by either side in litigation, to witnesses or by the sounds of it a potential defendants?

Stent Procedure Helps Brain Function In People At Risk For Stroke – Nearly Half Of Patients Improved On Cognitive Tests

Stent Procedure Helps Brain Function In People At Risk For Stroke – Nearly Half Of Patients Improved On Cognitive Tests

Stent

(Best Syndication) A treatment used to prevent stroke has been shown to improve mental function, according to researchers who presented their findings at the International Symposium on Endovascular Therapy (ISET). In what is being called “groundbreaking” research, 43 percent of the patients who received the minimally invasive treatment showed statistically improved brain function.

The procedure involves placing a small wire mesh tube (a stent) in the narrowed carotid artery. The carotid artery is a paired artery structure that delivers blood to the brain. After performing the procedure, called a carotid angioplasty, nearly half of the patients showed improvement within three months. The researchers said that in the right patient this treatment appears to be able to improve memory and the ability to reason, both of which are important for independent living.

Smoking Addiction – Brain region called Insula linked to Nicotine Cravings – Brain Damage in this area Erases Urge to Smoke

Smoking Addiction – Brain region called Insula linked to Nicotine Cravings – Brain Damage in this area Erases Urge to Smoke

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Brain damage is not currently a treatment for quitting smoking, but researchers have pinpointed a brain region called the insula, that is about the size of a silver dollar, that is responsible for creating the addiction for smoking cigarettes. The study was first reported in today’s issue of the journal, Science.

How did the scientist’s discover the location in the brain? Originally the researchers were inspired by a patient that had smoked approximately 40 cigarettes each day. The patient suffered strokes that damaged the insula region in his brain. Immediately after surviving the stroke the patient quit smoking. He said that he described the change as his body forgetting the urge to smoke.

Headache and Depression Link Found – Women Who Suffer From Migraines More Likely To Be Depressed – Chronic Pain Worst

Headache and Depression Link Found – Women Who Suffer From Migraines More Likely To Be Depressed – Chronic Pain Worstt

Gretchen Tietjen

Women who suffer from chronic headaches, especially migraines, are at a higher risk for depression according to researchers in Ohio. These women are also more likely to feel tired and experience other severe physical ailments.

"Painful physical symptoms may provoke or be a manifestation of major depression in women with chronic headache, and depression may heighten pain perception," said study author Gretchen Tietjen, MD with the University of Toledo-Health Science Campus and a member of the American Academy of Neurology. "This relation between migraine and major depression suggests a common neurobiology."

The researchers looked at 1032 women at headache clinics in five states. Of these, 593 reported episodic headache (fewer than 15 headaches per month) and 439 had chronic headache (more than 15 headaches per month). Ninety percent of the women were diagnosed with migraines.

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