Mind

Deafness - Gene for Hearing is Necessary to Deliver Audio to the Brain

Deafness - Gene for Hearing is Necessary to Deliver Audio to the Brain

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Researchers have previously pinpointed a gene that contributes to human deafness, but now they have more understanding as to how the molecular process works in the inner ear to send the audio to the brain. The study was first reported in the October 20th issue of the journal Cell.

First the researchers discovered that mice that lacked the gene otoferlin were profoundly deaf. This deafness was caused by an inability for the ear to translate the sounds into a chemical nerve messenger which would then pass the sound to the auditory nerves and then on to the brain.

"Study of the genes responsible for deafness can bring new insight into the molecular basis of how hearing works," said Christine Petit of the Institut Pasteur in Paris, France.

Alzheimer’s disease – Strawberries Boosts Memory Function in Mice

Alzheimer’s disease – Strawberries Boosts Memory Function in Mice

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Nutrition from fruits and vegetables containing fisetin helped improve long-term memory for healthy mice. Researchers from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies first reported a study in memory and nutrition with mice in this week's Online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Fisetin is a flavonoid that is found in strawberries and also found in other fruits and vegetables. Other foods containing fisetin include tomatoes, onions, oranges, apples, peaches, grapes, kiwifruit and persimmons. Researchers studied how eating fisetin helped improve the memory of healthy mice in hopes for finding another way to prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

Mediterranean Diet Lowers Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease – Study Found Fish Fruits and Vegetables Helped Prevent Mental Problem

Mediterranean Diet Lowers Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease – Study Found Fish Fruits and Vegetables Helped Prevent Mental Problem

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There may be more good news for people who eat a Mediterranean Diet, rich in fruits, vegetables and olive oil - researchers say the diet significantly reduced the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

The diet consists of high amounts of fruits, vegetables, legumes, cereals and fish, mild to moderate amounts of alcohol and low amounts of red meat and dairy products. Previous research has shown that the Mediterranean Diet reduced the risk of cancer, obesity, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, problems with processing glucose that may lead to diabetes, coronary heart disease and overall death.

Stopping The Stimming?

Stopping The Stimming?

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Autistic children and adults do many things that typical children and adults cannot understand, and the one that is often most prominent is self-stimulation. Called “stimming” in the autism world, self-stimulation is repetitive behavior used solely to engage the senses. Examples include humming, clapping, hand flapping, manipulating objects (such as ripping paper), or running in circles. While these behaviors may seem inappropriate or unnecessary to others, those who suffer from autism are not simple looking for attention or trying to be disruptive—stimming is a way to reduce the stresses of the world.

Autism is a disorder that causes people to react to sensory stimuli in non-typical ways. Stimming is one way of dealing with this bodily malfunction. For example, rocking is a common form of stimming. Some autistic people have asserted that rocking back a forth a few times helps them refocus when they become overly sensitive to the world around them. We all do this to some extent—can you remember a time when you tapped your pencil repetitively because you were nervous about a test or played with your note cards before giving a big speech. Often these and other behaviors, like biting your nails or whistling, are involuntary but help us calm down. Some autistic people need this calming effect every day, multiple times. Others simple enjoy the sensory feelings derived from stimming. In the same way that you may enjoy a back massage’s feelings, an autistic individual may enjoy the sensations felt from ripping paper.

Marijuana May Slow Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)Better Than Current Treatments – Active Ingredient Prevents Clumping of Protein - THC

Marijuana May Slow Alzheimer’s Disease (AD)Better Than Current Treatments – Active Ingredient Prevents Clumping of Protein - THC

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Researchers at the Scripps Institute in San Diego say that the active ingredient in marijuana, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), can help stave off the suffering of Alzheimer’s disease. THC prevents the neurotransmitter acetylcholine from breaking down.

The scientists say that THC works better than drugs currently on the market, and they hope this will lead to a better treatment and may even slow the progression of the symptoms. The drug effectively blocks clumps of protein from forming which can inhibit memory and cognition in Alzheimer’s patients.

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