Mind

Black Tea Lowers Stress Levels and May Reduce Heart Attack Risk - Drinkers Had Lower Levels of Cortisol and Blood Platelet Activ

Black Tea Lowers Stress Levels and May Reduce Heart Attack Risk - Drinkers Had Lower Levels of Cortisol and Blood Platelet Activation

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British researchers say that consumption of black tea can reduce stress hormones in the body and may lower the risk of heart attack. Not only were tea drinkers able to unwind quicker, they also had lower levels of the hormone cortisol after a stressful event.

The study involved 75 young male tea drinkers who were given either a tea or a placebo. All of the participants gave up other forms of caffeinated beverages including soft drinks and coffee. The first group was given a fruit-flavored caffeinated tea mixture made up of the constituents of an average cup of black tea, and the other group was given a caffeinated placebo identical in taste. All drinks were tea colored, but were designed to mask some of the normal sensory cues associated with tea drinking (such as smell, taste and familiarity of the brew).

Chemo Brain is Real and Can Last 10 Years – Chemotherapy Link to Memory Problems and Slow Cognitive Ability

Chemo Brain is Real and Can Last 10 Years – Chemotherapy Link to Memory Problems and Slow Cognitive Ability

Silverman
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Researchers believe they know why patients who undergo chemotherapy experience an effect referred to as “chemo-brain”, in which cognitive function is diminished and can last as long as a decade after treatment. Although the pet scans of chemotherapy patients show a lower metabolism in parts of the brain, they are not sure what is causing it.

Dr. Daniel Silverman said "The PET scans show a link between chemo-brain symptoms and lower metabolism in a key region of the frontal cortex. We found that the lower the patient's resting brain metabolism rate was, the more difficulty she had performing the memory test." Silverman is a member of UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and is head of neuronuclear imaging and associate professor of molecular and medical pharmacology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

Obesity may be linked to a Brain Addiction to Overeating

Obesity may be linked to a Brain Addiction to Overeating

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Overeating may be more closely linked to the same responses that people become addicted to desire drugs. Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory looked at how the brain and the stomach work together with emotions to cause a person to overeat. The report was first presented in the October 17th issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and also online in PNAS Early Edition in the October 2nd issue.

The researchers found that the brain circuits that create the desire for an obese person to overeat is the same circuitry as a person that craves drugs. These circuits are responsible for soothing negative emotions which may be the reason many obese people overeat.

Compulsive Shopping Disorder as Common with Men as with Women

Compulsive Shopping Disorder as Common with Men as with Women

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Compulsive buying disorder is described as a person that will binge shop and cause themselves financial debt because of the problem. Researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine found that men had as much of a problem with shopping as did women. The report was first published in the October issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

A person affected with compulsive shopping disorder will buy anything if they have an impulse to buy. Often they will purchase large amounts of unwanted items which accumulate and often go unused. The problem is that the compulsive shopper is also often faced with mounting debt. Often they will lie to their marital partner about their purchases to avoid conflict. This shopping spree problem often leads to bankruptcy, divorce, embezzlement, and sometimes even suicide attempts.

Parents Enraged At Glaxo Over Paxil Birth Defects

Parents Enraged At Glaxo Over Paxil Birth Defects

On July 28, 2006, a lawsuit was filed in Philadelphia against GlaxoSmithKline, on behalf of Adrian Vasquez, an infant born on April 19, 2004, with life-threatening congenital heart defects as a result of his mother having been prescribed Paxil during pregnancy.

Since birth, beginning when he was 8 days old, Adrian has undergone three open heart surgeries in an attempt to repair his heart. Each time, his parents were advised that his chance for survival was low.

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