Arthritis

Fish Oil Supplements helped Heal Bedsores

(Best Syndication News) - Taking fish oil supplements may help bedsores heal in critically ill patients, according to a study from the Tel Aviv University. The researchers noticed a 20-25 percent reduction in pressure ulcers when eight grams of fish oil were taken daily for three weeks. The results were published in the British Journal of Nutrition and the American Journal of Critical Care.

Prof. Pierre Singer of the Sackler Faculty of Medicine explained that bedsores are a common problem for critically ill patients because of constant pressure on the skin and tissue. Bedsores form from a lack oxygen because the blood flow is reduced and there is skin wetness. Other studies have found fish oil supplements were helpful for lowering blood pressure and reducing inflammation of the skin and in joints.

Water Aerobics just as good as other Cardio Workouts

credit: National Cancer Institute Linda Bartlett (Photographer) - PD

(Best Syndication News) - Exercising in the water has just as much aerobic benefit as working-out on land, suggests a new study. The researchers found pedaling an exercise bike in a swimming pool had a similar aerobic effect to a typical stationary bike workout. The study was presented today at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress.

The immersible ergocycle, which is a stationary exercise bike that can be put in a swimming pool, was studied. Many people might assume that moving in water is not as difficult as moving on land. The researchers compared land and water bicycling workouts for effectiveness.

Healthy participants perform exercise tests in the water and on land. The water level was up to their chest level. The intensity of the workout was increased every minute until the riders were exhausted. The researchers found that the land-workout was almost the same when they compared the maximal oxygen consumption rates.

Rheumatoid Arthritis patients are more likely to have Gum Disease

Teeth - BSN

(Best Syndication News) - A study found that patients with rheumatoid arthritis were four times more likely to have gum disease than those who were otherwise considered healthy. The study results were published in the online edition of the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases.

The researchers came to this conclusion by comparing the gum health of 91 adults diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 93 healthy adults that were matched for age and sex. All of the participants were non-smokers. The researchers report that smoking is a recognized risk factor for developing rheumatoid arthritis. None of the study participants were treated with arthritis medications.

Anxiety and Depression associated with Arthritis

credit: National Cancer Institute Daniel Sone (Photographer) - PD

(Best Syndication News) - One-third of US adults with arthritis who are over the age of 45 also suffer from anxiety or depression. Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published their results on anxiety and depression with arthritis patients in today’s issue of Arthritis Care & Research; a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell, which is also the official journal of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR).

Anxiety was around twice as common than depression in those suffering from arthritis. Despite the higher occurrence of anxiety, doctors tend to treat the depression more often. The researchers found anxiety in 31 percent of the participants, while depression was measured in 18 percent of the participants. Additionally, 84 percent of the participants who had depression also had anxiety.

Reduce Risk of Osteoporosis Fractures by Exercising in early 20’s

Credit: National Cancer Institute Linda Bartlett (photographer) - PD

(Best Syndication News) - Exercise as a young adult to reduce the risk for fractures caused by osteoporosis later on in life, concluded a study conducted in Sweden.

The University of Gothenburg's Sahlgrenska Academy researchers studied 833 Swedish men to determine that exercise in the early twenties helped to promote bone growth. Previous research concluded that the more bone mass people accumulate when young, the lower the risk for fractures from osteoporosis when they are older. In addition, other research has found that exercise before and during puberty is beneficial in making bones stronger.

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