Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Genetics – Nitric Oxide overproduction and Joint Damage

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Genetics – Nitric Oxide overproduction and Joint Damage

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Researchers from the University of Michigan Medical School have discovered data that questions the belief that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is strictly an autoimmune disorder. This study was first published in the November 2006 issue of Arthritis and Rheumatism.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that causes damage to the joints. This joint damage increases pain, loss of movement and bone deformities. There is an estimated 2.1 million people in the United States that have rheumatoid arthritis.

Most researchers believe that RA is an autoimmune disorder. The location in the DNA human genome for causing the RA disease is found in the location that is responsible for the body’s ability to identify antigens. In nearly 95% of RA patients they share a common sequence of DNA. If almost all of the RA patients have the same arrangement of DNA that causes this disease why would there be such a wide range of severely affected to symptom free individuals?

Arthritis - Different Kinds of Gout Causes

Arthritis - Different Kinds of Gout Causes

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Gout is a painful rheumatic disease that affects more than 800 out of every 100,000 individuals. Arthritic gout can occur at any time after puberty until the age of seventy-five. More common in men than women, arthritic gout can cause intense pain in the joints that can last for a few minutes or a few days. Those with gout should see their doctor to see if there are any medications that may prevent or help with the pain in case of another attack. Most people who have gout will have pain a few times a year. This can vary from person to person based on their lifestyle and heredity.

What is the cause of some of the painful symptoms associated with gout? Experts say the concentration in the blood is so high that the uric acid settles in the joints of people with gout, a leading cause of gout attacks. While the cause of gout is deposits of needle-like crystals of uric acid in connective tissue, some physicians might misdiagnose gout because of associated symptoms such as redness, swelling, heat, pain and stiffness of the joints that resembles rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions.

Latest Pfizer Celebrex Court Ruling 50-50

Latest Pfizer Celebrex Court Ruling 50-50

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According to Pfizer, Celebrex is still selling like hot cakes with worldwide sales of $471 million in the second quarter of 2006, representing growth of 17% over the same period last year, with sales in the US of $355 million.

"We continue to expect full-year Celebrex revenues of at least $2 billion, an ambitious target given the ongoing pressures in the arthritis market," Pfizer told shareholders in its Second Quarter 2006 SEC filing.

Notwithstanding the fact that the FDA asked Pfizer not to run ads to promote more use of Celebrex, and that the company previously granted that request, Pfizer is right back at it. In April 2006, it began advertising Celebrex "in alignment with our new Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) advertising principles, highlighting Celebrex's unique clinical profile and benefits," Pfizer wrote in its First Quarter 2006 SEC filing.

Pfizer Celebrex Lawsuits - 1500 and Counting

Pfizer Celebrex Lawsuits - 1500 and Counting

The first Celebrex trial, originally set for June 6, 2006, has been delayed indefinitely, reportedly to give attorneys more time to gather information. Although no new trial date has been set, legal analysts now predict that Celebrex trials will begin in early 2007.

The delay was requested by a federal judge in San Francisco, where Pfizer is facing around 1,500 lawsuits related to its painkillers Celebrex and Bextra, according to Bloomberg News. In light of the studies on Celebrex that have surfaced over the past year, any media update should say 1,500 lawsuits and counting.

Rheumatoid Arthritis – Central Nervous System works to monitor Inflammation

Rheumatoid Arthritis – Central Nervous System works to monitor Inflammation

Researchers from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine demonstrated how rheumatoid arthritis inflammation of the joints are sensed and adjusted by the central nervous system (CNS). The CNS has a potential to directly control immune system responses. The study will be first published in the September edition of the journal Public Library of Science (PLoS) Medicine.

“The central nervous system is not just a passive responder to the outside world, but is fully able to control many previously unanticipated physiologic responses, including immunity and inflammation," said Gary S. Firestein, M.D., Professor of Medicine, Chief of the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, and Director of UCSD's Clinical Investigation Institute, who led the study.

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