Diabetes

Researchers Discover Protein To Control Inflammation – Could Lead To Treatments For Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

Researchers Discover Protein To Control Inflammation – Could Lead To Treatments For Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

Youhai Chen

(Best Syndication) Pennsylvania researchers have discovered a key regulator protein called Bcl-3 which helps the body control the inflammation response to infections. The protein does this by interfering with a critical biochemical process called ubiquitination. Previous studies found that Bcl-3 plays a role in immunity, but this is the first research to suggest it regulates inflammation by blocking ubiquitination.

Diabetes, sepsis, and rheumatoid arthritis could be treated in the future by gene therapy. “The novelty of our study is the discovery that Bcl-3 acting on gene expression has a profound effect on inflammation,” according to Ruaidhri Carmody, PhD, Senior Research Investigator in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and first author of the Science paper.

Metabolic And Insulin Resistance Syndrome Linked To Cancer Diabetes Sleep Disorders and Heart Disease

Metabolic And Insulin Resistance Syndrome Linked To Cancer Diabetes Sleep Disorders and Heart Disease

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(Best Syndication) Researchers will present evidence at the 5th Annual World Congress on the Insulin Resistance Syndrome (WCIRS) that a relatively common syndrome can lead to higher risk for cardiovascular disease, breathing and sleep disorders, liver disease, Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, Alzheimer’s Disease and more.

The confirmation that Insulin Resistance Syndrome increases disease risk will be presented at the conference in Boston from October 11-13, 2007. Dr. Reaven discovered Insulin Resistance Syndrome, often referred to as the Metabolic Syndrome or Syndrome X, back in 1988. Since then researchers have been studying the far-reaching effects of this condition.

The condition is relatively common and is characterized by:

Avandia Diabetes Drug Evaluated By FDA Panel For Heart Attack Risk – GlaxoSmithKlein Disputes Claims Of Danger

Avandia Diabetes Drug Evaluated By FDA Panel For Heart Attack Risk – GlaxoSmithKlein Disputes Claims Of Danger

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(Best Syndication) The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is evaluating the safety of the diabetes drug Avandia Monday. A panel of experts is listening to both sides of the argument concerning the GlaxoSmithKlien (GSK) drug, whose stock dropped more the two percent on the news.

Earlier this month German researchers released a study that showed that the drug “might worsen complications of the disease such as weight gain, swelling, bone fractures and heart disease.” This was a review of an analysis of studies done back in May that suggested an increased risk of death from cardiovascular causes in patients taking the medication.

Diabetes Insulin delivered by Pills - Researchers developing Plant Grown Insulin from genetically modified Lettuce

Diabetes Insulin delivered by Pills - Researchers developing Plant Grown Insulin from genetically modified Lettuce

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[Best Syndication] Researchers from the University of Central Florida have studied the effects of genetically altered tobacco plants that make plant insulin that showed promising results in diabetic mice. This UCF study received $2 million in funding from The National Institutes of Health. The study was first reported in the July issue of Plant Biotechnology Journal.

The researchers were able to take freeze dried plant cells from the modified tobacco plant and give it to five-week-old diabetic mice as a powder for over an eight week period of time. At the end of the eight weeks the diabetic mice had achieved normal blood and urine sugar levels and the mice were also having their own cells produce normal levels of insulin.

Type 2 Diabetes – List of top 10 drugs with Metformin Ranking Highest

Type 2 Diabetes – List of top 10 drugs with Metformin Ranking Highest

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Oral medication is a common treatment option for patients with type 2 diabetes. A study at Johns Hopkins found that metformin which was approved by the FDA back in 1995 showed the most benefits compared to nine other, mostly newer drugs on the market for diabetes.

Metformin also sold as Glucophage, Riomet, and Fortamet was shown to be effective at controlling blood sugar levels and was less likely to cause weight gain and at the same time was more effective than the other medications at lowering bad cholesterol levels.

The benefits to taking medication to control blood glucose and cholesterol in type 2 diabetics are an important way to help slow down or even potentially prevent heart disease or other damage, such as blindness, and kidney failure.

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