Diabetes

Both Regular and Diet Soft Drinks Increase Diabetes And Heart Disease Risk Even after Adjusting for Calorie Consumption

Both Regular and Diet Soft Drinks Increase Diabetes And Heart Disease Risk Even after Adjusting for Calorie Consumption

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(Best Syndication) Drinking more than one soft drink or soda per day, whether diet or regular, can increase the risk of metabolic syndrome, according to researchers in Boston. The data comes from the Framingham Heart Study involving nearly 9,000 personal observations made in middle-aged men and women over four years at three different times.

Metabolic Syndrome is a “cluster of risk factors” that can lead to both heart disease and diabetes. It is characterized and includes three of the following risk factors:

1) Excess waist circumference
2) High blood pressure
3) Elevated triglycerides
4) Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL “good” cholesterol)
5) High fasting glucose levels

Weight Lifting could be helpful reports American Heart Association

Weight Lifting could be helpful reports American Heart Association

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[Best Syndication] A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association recommends that there can be benefits for people with heart disease and weight lifting in addition to aerobic exercise.

There are some people that should not participate with weight training. Those that should not do resistance training are those with unstable heart disease, uncontrolled high blood pressure or heart rhythm disorders, infections in and around the heart, and some other serious problems. Anyone should consult with a doctor before beginning any new exercise program.

The benefits of weight training help people to function better in daily living.

Type 1 diabetes gene identified that raises risk

Type 1 diabetes gene identified that raises risk

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[Best Syndication] Researchers from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia along with McGill University in Montreal have found a gene variation that could contribute to a child’s risk for developing type 1 diabetes. The study first appeared in the July 15th online letter in the journal Nature.

Type 1 diabetes develops when a person’s own immune system destroys insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. With the absence of insulin a person with type 1 diabetes must frequently inject insulin to help keep the blood glucose levels in check.

The researchers are continuing to pinpoint more genetic flags that could possibly contribute to type 1 diabetes. The researchers may have discovered around 15 – 20 other potential genes that could be related to the disease.

Diabetes – Pumpkin Extract showed some promise for Insulin Reduction or Replacement

Diabetes – Pumpkin Extract showed some promise for Insulin Reduction or Replacement

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Researchers from East China Normal University discovered that diabetic rats fed pumpkin extract improved plasma insulin and insulin-positive (beta) cells to almost normal levels. The study by Lisa Richards in Chemistry & Industry reported on this study.

“Pumpkin extract is potentially a very good product for pre-diabetic persons, as well as those who have already developed diabetes,” said lead researcher, Tao Xia, from the East China Normal University.

The diabetic rats that received the pumpkin extract achieved plasma insulin levels that were only 5% less than normal rats. The diabetic mice also benefited with improved insulin-positive (beta) cells, with only 8% fewer than normal rats.

Test for Kidney Disease could also warn of potential Pre-diabetes

Test for Kidney Disease could also warn of potential Pre-diabetes

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[Best Syndication] A blood measurement of cystatin C, which is used for testing for early-stage kidney impairment, could also be a warning flag for a person developing pre-diabetes. A study by the University at Buffalo reported that persons with high levels of cystatin C had a three-fold risk of developing pre-diabetes. The researchers first reported their study in the July 2007 issue of Diabetes Care.

Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when fasting blood glucose levels are over 100 and under 126. Pre-diabetes is important to treat before it becomes a permanent Type 2 diabetes, which is known to increase problems with heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness and nerve damage.

“It’s important to identify people at risk of pre-diabetes very early, because you can prevent this condition from developing by making changes in diet and lifestyle,” said Richard P. Donahue, Ph.D., first author on the study.

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