Diabetes

Retinopathy Blindness - Fish Oil Supplements may help protect eyes with Omega-3 Fatty Acids, DHA, and EPA

Retinopathy Blindness - Fish Oil Supplements may help protect eyes with Omega-3 Fatty Acids, DHA, and EPA

This illustration highlights the differences between normal retinal blood-vessel development (at left) and the pathological vessel growth (at right) in the eye of a child with retinopathy of prematurity. Red blobs represent abnormal vessel development in the diseased eye. - courtesy Kip Connor, PhD, Children's Hospital Boston

[Best Syndication] Researchers from the Children’s Hospital in Boston, along with other colleagues, found that abnormal blood vessel growth in retinopathy can be slowed down by omega-3 fatty acids, DHA, and EPA which is found in fish oil supplements. This eye protection could possibly prevent or slow down blindness that is a complication of Retinopathy. Premature babies are at risk for this kind of vision loss, and the researchers are planning a clinical trial to test the effects of the omega-3 supplementation on their eye health. Other blood vessel related causes of blindness, including “wet” age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy may also have potential help from fish oil supplements.

There are an estimated 4 million diabetic patients and 40,000 premature babies in the United States that are diagnosed with Retinopathy. The disease begins with a los of blood vessels in the retina. Because of the lack of oxygen being delivered the eye grows more vessels. The vessels are abnormal in growth and leak and become malformed and over-abundant. After the deformed blood vessels take over it causes the retina to separate from the other eye tissue which is called retinal detachment. This detachment of the retina is what causes the blindness.

The researchers, led by Lois Smith, MD, PhD, and Kip Connor, PhD, of Children’s Hospital Boston’s Department of Ophthalmology and Harvard Medical School, and John Paul SanGiovanni, ScD, of the National Eye Institute (NEI), National Institutes of Health, worked together to study mice that were fed a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids or high in omega-6 fatty acids. The mice that had the omega-3 diet received ample amounts of DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and its precursor EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid.)

No MedGuide for Zyprexa after Eleven Years of Death and Injury

No MedGuide for Zyprexa after Eleven Years of Death and Injury

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The FDA held a public hearing on June 12 and 13, 2007, to obtain feedback on the FDA's Medication Guide program. Medication Guides contain the FDA-approved patient information for a drug and are handed out by pharmacists to help prevent adverse events.

Ellen Bleecker Liversidge appeared at this hearing as a board member of the Alliance for Human Research Protection to offer feedback for the Medication Guide on Zyprexa, an atypical antipsychotic marketed by Eli Lilly. She began her talk by explaining why the testimony that she had planned to give had to be changed at the last minute.

"I sat down and read over the material provided for this hearing and was all set to speak on content as well as delivery systems," she told the FDA panel. "However, I didn't get very far because, believe it or not, there was no Zyprexa MedGuide."

Avandia Hearing Exposes FDA as Negligent Watchdog

Avandia Hearing Exposes FDA as Negligent Watchdog

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The FDA has ignored repeated warnings about the potential cardiac risks associated with the diabetes drug Avandia, and medical experts predict Americans will likely pay a heavy price for trusting its negligent watchdog because US doctors wrote 13 million Avandia prescriptions in 2006 alone, according to IMS Health a medical information tracking firm.

On May 21, 2007, the New England Journal of Medicine published a meta-analysis of the heart attack and death rates from 42 Avandia trials completed before or after drug approval, that showed a 43% excess incidence of heart attack in Avandia patients. Dr Steven Nissen, Chairman of the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic and Immediate Past-President of the American College of Cardiology, and statistician, Kathy Wolski, MPH conducted the study.

Diabetes Contributes To Shorter Lifespan And Increased Years With Cardiovascular Disease

Diabetes Contributes To Shorter Lifespan And Increased Years With Cardiovascular Disease

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(Best Syndication) Researchers in Europe say that people over 50 years of age with diabetes may not live as long as those without the disease, and may have fewer years without cardiovascular disease. The research is published in the June 11th issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

The researchers used data from the Framingham Heart Study, a group of 5,209 men and women age 28 to 62 years recruited between 1948 and 1951 and followed for more than 46 years. "Having diabetes at age 50 years and older represents not only a significant increase in the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and mortality but also an important decrease in life expectancy and life expectancy free of cardiovascular disease," the authors wrote.

Improve your ‘Good’ HDL Cholesterol Levels with Exercise

Improve your ‘Good’ HDL Cholesterol Levels with Exercise

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[Best Syndication] Exercise has many health benefits and a study found that you can improve your HDL ‘good’ cholesterol levels by modest activities. The study is published in the May 28th issue of Archives of Internal Medicine.

HDL-C is a low level high-density lipoprotein cholesterol that has been pinpointed as an identifying risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The researchers report that there is strong support that suggests that people that are more physically active have higher HDL-C levels. "Thus, the value of regular aerobic exercise in increasing serum [blood] HDL-C level and in reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease has received widespread acceptance," the authors write. "In contrast, results of aerobic exercise studies vary considerably, depending on the exercise program (e.g., duration, intensity or frequency) and characteristics of subjects at baseline."

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