Diabetes

Common Genetic Defect Increases Risk For Stroke – Hemochromatosis Gene Inherited – More Common in Europe – Denmark Study

Common Genetic Defect Increases Risk For Stroke – Hemochromatosis Gene Inherited – More Common in Europe – Denmark Study

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(Best Syndication) A common genetic defect increases the risk for stroke, according to researchers in Denmark. The common genetic defect is passed on through families causing hemochromatosis which leads to excessive iron in the body. This overload can eventually lead to organ dysfunction, diabetes, and liver cirrhosis.

Out of 9,178 people in the Danish study, 393 people had a stroke and 504 people developed cerebrovascular disease over a 24 year period. The researchers screened all of the participants for the H63D genetic defect in the HFE gene (also known as the hemochromatosis gene).

Hemochromatosis (can also be spelled haemochromatosis) is the most common iron overload disorder. It is characterized by the improper processing by the body of dietary iron. Since the body has no way to get rid of the extra iron, they ware stored in the organs, primarily the heart, liver and pancreas. Although there are treatments, without management (phlebotomy – or giving blood) the organs will begin to fail.

Sugared Soda Pop Increases The Risk Of Obesity – Link Between Soft Drinks And Type-2 Diabetes And Calorie Intake - Study

Sugared Soda Pop Increases The Risk Of Obesity – Link Between Soft Drinks And Type-2 Diabetes And Calorie Intake - Study

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(Best Syndication) Researchers say that there is an association between non-diet soft drinks and body weight and type-2 diabetes. In 2005 a study determined that soft drinks were the single largest source of calories in the U.S. The new research compares health outcomes with dietary consumption of sugared soft drinks.

The researchers systematically reviewed 88 studies. Not all studies were conclusive, but 19 out of 21 studies showed that people who drank more soda also consumed more calories. Those studies with the most reliable statistical methods showed the largest effects. The researchers wanted to take into account other variables. They believe that the “true test” of the links would come from “a critical mass of large studies employing strong methods.”

Cocoa May Reduce Risk Of Cancer Heart Attack Stroke and Diabetes – Should Epicatechin Be Considered A Vitamin – Tea and Wine Too

Cocoa May Reduce Risk Of Cancer Heart Attack Stroke and Diabetes – Should Epicatechin Be Considered A Vitamin – Tea and Wine Too

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(Best Syndication) Cocoa may have so many beneficial properties that one researcher suggests that it be considered a vitamin. Harvard Professor Norman Hollenberghas has become a proponent of epicatechin, a substance found in cocoa, and has spent years studying the benefits of drinking cocoa.

Hollenberg told Chemistry and Industry magazine reporter Marina Murphy that the Kuna people in Panama drink up to 40 cups of cocoa per week and their risk of 4 of the 5 most common killer diseases has been reduced to less than 10%. He believes that epicatechin is the key chemical that is reducing their risk of stroke, heart failure, cancer and diabetes.

Eating Whole-Grain Cereal may reduce risk of Heart Failure

Eating Whole-Grain Cereal may reduce risk of Heart Failure

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Researchers found that people who eat whole-grain breakfast cereals seven or more times each week had a lower risk of heart failure. The study is based on data collected from the Physician’s Health Study. This study was first presented at the American Heart Association’s 47th annual Conference on Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology and Prevention.

Cereals that were considered whole-grain had to have at least 25 percent oat or bran as ingredients. The researchers found that those that ate seven or more servings of these whole-grain cereals saw a 25 percent reduction in the cases of heart failure during the duration of the study. Those who ate two to six servings per week saw a 22 percent reduction, and those that ate one serving per week had a 14 percent reduction for developing heart failure. The researchers suggest that this study would need to be confirmed with other studies to insure that whole grain cereal reduces the risk for heart failure.

Chain Restaurants serving up 2,000 Calorie Portions

Chain Restaurants serving up 2,000 Calorie Portions

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In CSPI’s March issue of the Nutrition Action Healthletter “Chain Restaurants Encourage Americans To Over Eat Says Watchdog,” is warning consumers of the 2,000 calorie dinners, appetizers and desserts that are being served up at popular dining restaurants. Some of these are Ruby Tuesday, On the Border, and The Cheesecake Factory. Don’t be fooled that other chain restaurants are not guilty of having extreme calories on their menus, as most restaurants are serving up large portions.

While the article screams for calorie labeling on the menus, this report should be a wake up call for Americans. While most of the fast food restaurants get picked on for calorie overloading, we don’t hear a lot about sit down restaurants.

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