Type 1 - diabetes

Kidney Disease and MRI a Deadly Combination

Kidney Disease and MRI a Deadly Combination

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MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) is a common and, in most cases, safe medical test. However, for people with kidney disease, MRI can cause a rare disease called NSF/NFD (nephrogenic systemic fibrosis or nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy).

NSF/NFD is a very painful and debilitating condition, when can be fatal. No consistently effective treatment has been found. Only a small percentage of cases have been successfully reversed.

What causes NSF/NFD

NSF/NFD is caused by gadolinium-based contrast agents used in MRI’s (magnetic resonance imaging). At this point, it has only been confirmed in people with kidney disease, although there have been some unconfirmed reports of people with healthy kidneys suffering from NSF/NFD.

Drinking Black Tea acts as Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes

Drinking Black Tea acts as Insulin for Type 2 Diabetes

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[Best Syndication] Researchers believe that black tea might be able to treat type 2 diabetes in the future. The researchers suggest that tea could possibly act as an insulin substitute. The study results were published in the journal, Aging Cell.

BBC reported that Dr. Graham Rena, from the University of Dundee, is the lead researcher who said that they believe to have found ingredients in tea that mimic insulin on proteins called foxos. There are several key ingredients in black tea, and they are believed to be theaflavins and thearubigins.

Teaching Your Patient to Inject Insulin - Diabetes

Teaching Your Patient to Inject Insulin - Diabetes

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When teaching your patient how to inject insulin, give her the following instructions:

Assemble all equipment. Then wash your hands with warm water and soap.

If you're using intermediate-acting or long-acting insulin, gently roll the bottle between your hands. Never shake the bottle. If you're using regular insulin, skip this step.

Clean the top of the bottle with alcohol. let it dry so that you don't inadvertently introduce alcohol into the insulin.

Inject an amount of air into the bottle equal to the amount of insulin to be drawn up.

Use of Protein - Diabetes Treatment

Use of Protein - Diabetes Treatment

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A person needs protein for normal growth and development and maintenance of body protein stores. Proteins are made up of amino acids that are used for building and rebuilding the body. Proteins also act as enzymes, hormones, and antibodies. Proteins not needed for growth and development are converted into glycogen or fats and stored in the body until they're needed as energy.

The recommended protein intake for a patient with diabetes is 10% to 20% of total daily calories. Eating too much protein increases the glomerular rate, which makes the kidneys work harder. If your patient develops nephropathy, teach her to restrict her protein to 0.8 g/kg of body weight per day. For example, a man who weighs 68 kilograms should consume 54 grams of protein per day. Reducing protein intake decreases proteinuria and eases the work performed by the kidneys.

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Selecting The Right Shoes for those with Diabetes

Peripheral Vascular Disease: Selecting The Right Shoes for those with Diabetes

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Advise your patient to purchase shoes that are made of natural material, such as leather. Explain that synthetics don't allow enough air circulation. If she has decreased sensation in her feet, suggest that she take a family member along when she buys new shoes. She can ask the family member to feel her foot through the shoe to make sure it isn't too tight. If necessary, tell her how to order adaptive footwear, such as extradepth or specially constructed shoes.

If your patient has an orthotic insert and she's buying regular shoes, tell her to make sure she has enough room between the sole and upper part of the shoe for the insert. Explain that orthotics help avoid pressure sores by dispersing pressure evenly across her foot. If she has foot deformities, such as claw toes, tell her to make sure that her toes don't rub against her shoe.

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