Womans Health

Few Younger Women Realized They Were Having Heart Attack – Warning Signs Missed

Few Younger Women Realized They Were Having Heart Attack – Warning Signs Missed

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(Best Syndication) Researchers say that most women 55 years and younger who have heart attacks don’t recognize warning signs. Although nearly 90 percent of the women in the study had the typical heart attack symptoms of chest pain, most young women did not recognize them as a heart attack.

“The number of young women who die from coronary heart disease each year is roughly comparable to the number of women who die of breast cancer in this age group,” said Judith Lichtman, Ph.D., lead author of the study. She evaluated 24 women (55 and younger) who had heart attacks and were admitted to one of two Connecticut hospitals for this study.

Once A Year Treatment Reduces Incidence Of Hip and Spine Fractures – Bone Mineral Density Is Increased With Injection of Reclast

Once A Year Treatment Reduces Incidence Of Hip and Spine Fractures – Bone Mineral Density Is Increased With Injection of Reclast Yearly

Dennis Black, Ph.D

(Best Syndication) A once a year treatment can significantly reduce the incidence of bone fractures in postmenopausal women. The Phase III clinical trials involved more than 7,700 women with postmenopausal osteoporosis between the ages of 65 and 89 in 27 countries. Some of the women were given a once-yearly 15-minute infusion of the drug Reclast® (zoledronic acid).

Dennis Black, Ph.D., lead author of the study and Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco compared the women receiving the drug with those taking a placebo. Reclast reduced the frequency of fractures among the areas of the body that are typically affected by osteoporosis.

Link Between Migraine Headaches in Women with Stroke and Heart Attack – Better Prenatal Care – Age Also a Factor

Link Between Migraine Headaches in Women with Stroke and Heart Attack – Better Prenatal Care – Age Also a Factor

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(Best Syndication) Researchers say that there is a link between migraines during pregnancy and vascular diseases, such as stroke and heart disease. They evaluated data from 17 million women discharged for pregnancy between 2000-2003. Of those, 33,956 were treated for migraines.

Those women treated for migraines were 19 times more likely to suffer a stroke, five times more likely to have a heart attack. Also, these women were more than twice as likely to have heart disease, blood clots and other vascular problems. They found that women who were 35 or older when they delivered were more likely to have migraines during pregnancy.

“Women with persistent migraine during pregnancy should be aware of their risk factors, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, history of blood clots, heart disease, and prior stroke,” said study author Cheryl Bushnell, MD, with Duke University in Durham, NC, and Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology. Bushnell says there also seems to be a connection between migraines and preeclampsia, the most common and dangerous complication of pregnancy.

Women Hit Harder By Alcohol Abuse Than Men – Adversely Affected More Than Male Counterparts – Loss of Cognitive Skills

Women Hit Harder By Alcohol Abuse Than Men – Adversely Affected More Than Male Counterparts – Loss of Cognitive Skills

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(Best Syndication) Women are more adversely affected by alcohol than men, according to US researchers. The study, which was conducted in Russia, also found that women can become alcohol dependent more quickly than men and that alcohol more severely impairs a woman's cognitive functioning.

Alcohol is likely to impair a woman’s perceptual and visual planning and processing, working memory and motor control than a man’s. "Our study showed that female alcoholics experience a greater decrement in cognitive and motor functions and sustain an accelerated decline in processing speed than males," said Barbara Flannery, Ph.D., research psychologist at the Research Triangle Institute (RTI) in North Carolina.

Aspirin More Effective For Men Than Women To Prevent Blood Clots – Platelet Inhibition 4 Times Greater – Heart Attack Risk Less

Aspirin More Effective For Men Than Women To Prevent Blood Clots – Platelet Inhibition 4 Times Greater – Heart Attack Risk Less

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(Best Syndication) Aspirin is a more effective therapy for coronary artery disease in men than women, according to new researchers from the University of Michigan. Although previous research has indicated that the therapy benefits men more than women, no one knew how much more.

The research indicates that aspirin therapy is four times more likely to be ineffective in men compared to women with the same medical history. "I was surprised by how big of a difference it was for females," said Michael Dorsch, clinical pharmacist and adjunct clinical instructor at the University Of Michigan College Of Pharmacy.

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