Womans Health

Father's Age as a Risk Factor For Autism

Father's Age as a Risk Factor For Autism

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The average age of fatherhood is increasing in the US and in Western Europe. Some research shows that offspring of older fathers are at increased risk for diseases and conditions (Bray et al., 2006). Some experts predict an upswing in cases of schizophrenia will accompany the increasing average paternal age. “The actual percentage of cases with paternal germ line-derived schizophrenia in a given population will depend on the demographics of paternal childbearing age, among other factors. With an upswing in paternal age, these cases would be expected to become more prevalent” (Malaspina et al., 2006). Approximately 25-33% of all cases of schizophrenia may be due to the father’s age at conception, according to Malaspina (2006). Malaspina sees a connection between advancing paternal age and neural functioning difficulties in people with autism and with schizophrenia. According to Tarin et al. (1998), there are well over 30 known conditions that the offspring of older fathers are more at risk for (see chart on paternal aging in the linked article).

Abortion and Miscarriage Do Not Increase Breast Cancer Risk – Having A Baby May Decrease Chances For Women

Abortion and Miscarriage Do Not Increase Breast Cancer Risk – Having A Baby May Decrease Chances For Women

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(Best Syndication) Researchers say that having an abortion or miscarriage will not increase the risk for breast cancer in premenopausal women, but younger women under the age of 35 who carry a pregnancy to term, appear to have a reduced lifetime risk of breast cancer.

The study indicates that pregnancy may accelerate breast cell differentiation, the process by which cells take on specialized roles. The authors of the study came to this conclusion after reviewing the medical records of participants in the Nurses’ Health Study II (NHSII).

Link Between Hormone Replacement Therapy HRT And Cervical Cancer – Study Published In April Lancet

Link Between Hormone Replacement Therapy And Cervical Cancer – Study Published In April Lancet

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(Best Syndication) A study published in the April 19, 2007 journal Lancet found that there is a link between Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) and Ovarian Cancer. Women who had HRT were at a 20 percent higher risk for ovarian cancer compared to women who never received the treatment.

The Million Women Study (MWS) data showed that women who used HRT for less than 5 years were not at an increased risk. This corresponds to data from the Nurse’s Health Study, but conflicts with the Women’s Health Initiative study. That study did not show an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

Drop in Hormone Therapy Use = Fewer Breast Cancers for 2004

Drop in Hormone Therapy Use = Fewer Breast Cancers for 2004

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With the masses of postmenopausal having gone off hormone therapy (some after having been on on it for eons), M.D. Anderson's Peter Ravdin is reporting for the 2nd time in less than 6 months that the rates of breast cancer for 2004 were, like 2003, lower than expected, according to data obtained by SEER.

The initial report in December 2006 noted 7% fewer cases of breast cancer diagnosed in American women for 2003, which scientists claimed was most likely tied to the dramatic drop in hormone use by menopausal women after the WHI found HRT posed serious risks. Now, the data for 2004 have been released and the drop in breast cancer incidence has continued, indicating that the previous year's findings weren't just a fluke.

Media overhypes insignificant subgroup findings from WHI - Womens Health Initiative

Media overhypes insignificant subgroup findings from WHI - Womens Health Initiative

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Today, a new analysis of the WHI hormone trials stratified the heart attack and stroke findings by subgroups, based on a woman's age and time since menopause. For heart attacks, only the interaction between treatment and years since menopause was significant, which showed increased risk of heart attack the further into menopause a woman was. However, a woman's actual age did not yield any signficant differences in heart attack or all cause mortality rates, and the risk of stroke was elevated for all women, regardless of age.

While this information is essentially a rehash of all the data women have been bombarded with over these last couple of years, the media has not done a great job of truly clarifying what the trials' results showed and has, instead, emphasized findings that were not significant. For women taking hormones (estrogen/progestin or estrogen alone) there was a nonsignificant 24% decrease in heart attacks for those who were less than 10 years postmenopausal. However, for the women who were 20+ years postmenopausal, the risk of heart attack was 28% higher, which was significant.

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