Womans Health

Drug Makers Want Women of Childbearing Years

Drug Makers Want Women of Childbearing Years

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Drug makers are hell-bent on recovering the antidepressant customer base represented by women of childbearing years. With doctors now reluctant to prescribe the drugs to pregnant women, a new recruitment scheme has cropped up. Screening programs are being set up all over the country to screen every pregnant woman for mental disorders.

The name-brand selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants, or SSRIs, with a stake in this controversy, include Paxil, by GlaxoSmithKline; Zoloft, from Pfizer; Prozac by Eli Lilly; Celexa and Lexapro, from Forest Laboratories; and Luvox, from Solvay.

According to one of the world's leading experts on SSRIs, Dr David Healy, a professor at the University of Wales College of Medicine, "there is quite a movement at the moment to say all pregnant women are depressed."

Overweight kids – Weight Problem could start in Pregnancy

Overweight kids – Weight Problem could start in Pregnancy

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A study by the Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention of Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care found that women who gained excess weight during pregnancy had were four times more likely to have overweight children in early childhood than those who did not gain enough weight during pregnancy. The study was first published in the April issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

The study researched data collected from 1,044 mothers and their children in from Project Viva, which is a study of pregnant women and children located at the Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention's Obesity Prevention Program.

"Maternal weight gain during pregnancy is an important determinant of birth outcomes," says lead author Emily Oken, MD, MPH, instructor in the Department of Ambulatory Care and Prevention. "These findings suggest that pregnancy weight gain can influence child health even after birth and may cause the obstetric community to rethink current guidelines."

Eating excess Trans Fat can increase the Risk for Heart Disease

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[Best Syndication] Partially hydrogenated vegetable oil also known as trans fats has been associated with increasing a person’s risk for developing coronary heart disease (CHD). Women that had the highest levels of trans fat in their blood had a three times risk for CHD compared to those that had the lowest levels. The study was first published online and will be published in the upcoming issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

"The strength of this study is that the amount of trans fatty acid levels was measured in blood samples from the study population. Because humans cannot synthesize trans fatty acids, the amount of trans fat in red blood cells is an excellent biomarker of trans fat intake," said senior author Frank Hu, associate professor of nutrition and epidemiology at HSPH.

Aspirin Reduced Risk of Death For Women – Not All Agree With Findings – Womens Health Study Disputes Nurses Cancer Heart Disease

Aspirin Reduced Risk of Death For Women – Not All Agree With Findings – Womens Health Study Disputes Nurses Cancer Heart Disease

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(Best Syndication) Researchers say that aspirin in low and moderate doses reduced the risk of death from any cause in women. The data was extrapolated from 79,439 women enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study. The participants were all female nurses who had no history of cancer or cardiovascular disease.

The women who took aspirin had a 25 percent lower risk of death from any cause compare to women who never used aspirin regularly. Women who used aspirin had a 38 percent lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease and a 12 percent lower risk of death from cancer.

Atkins Is Best Diet For Women According to Stanford University Study – Zone Ornish and LEARN Diets Were Compared-South Beach Not

Atkins Is Best Diet For Women According to Stanford University Study – Zone Ornish and LEARN Diets Were Compared-South Beach Not

Christopher Gardner

The case for low-carbohydrate diets is gaining weight. Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have completed the largest and longest-ever comparison of four popular diets, and the lowest-carbohydrate Atkins diet came out on top.

Of the more than 300 women in the study, those randomly assigned to follow the Atkins diet for a year not only lost more weight than the other participants, but also experienced the most benefits in terms of cholesterol and blood pressure.

"Many health professionals, including us, have either dismissed the value of very-low-carbohydrate diets for weight loss or been very skeptical of them," said lead researcher Christopher Gardner, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center. "But it seems to be a viable alternative for dieters."

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