Womans Health

Miscarriage risk increased for Underweight Women

Miscarriage risk increased for Underweight Women

Stock Photo

If a women has a low body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy are at a 72% increased risk of having a miscarriage in the first three months of pregnancy. The good news is that they can improve their chances by taking supplements and eating fresh fruits and vegetables. The study was first reported in the online edition of BJOG, An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

The study comes from a research team at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. The researchers wanted to determine biological, behavioral, and lifestyle risk factors related to having a miscarriage.

Known risk factors such as increased maternal age, previous history of miscarriage, and infertility but in a large number of miscarriages it is not understood why the woman had lost their pregnancy. It was suspected that alcohol consumption, smoking and caffeine caused the other unknown cases and this has not definitely been confirmed as true.

Manganese- Benefits, Dosage, Deficiency, Sources

Manganese- Benefits, Dosage, Deficiency, Sources

Stock Photo

The correction of bone deformity in poultry with manganese was discovered in 1936 by Norris and Lyons. Later studies in 1961 by Hurley and Everson pronounced importance of manganese in growth, bone development, reproduction, and central nervous system.

The human body contains 10-20 mg of manganese, and is widely distributed in body specially in intestinal track, liver and reproductive organs. It absorption and excretion is on similar lines as of Iron. It is stored in the blood and liver. The serum manganese level gets raised following a heat attack. The defence mechanism of body on manganese. It is excreted in the faeces, which gets enhanced with high calcium intakes. The urine has only traces of it.

Iron functions and deficiency

Iron functions and deficiency

Stock Photo

Functions on the Body: Iron is generally absorbed from the whole of the gastro intestinal tract but most of it comes from the upper part of the small intestine mainly the duodenum. Dietary Iron is absorbed through the mucosal cells in ferrous form. Iron in diet is present in ferric state which is reduced to ferrous during absorption, with the help of Vitamin C, glutathione and amino acid –SH groups. After entering the mucosal cell in ferrous form, the iron molecules are soon reconverted into ferric state, which combine with a protein, apoferritin of the mucosal cells to form ferritin. Such ferritin is one of the storage forms of iron in the tissues, which passes into the blood. This ferritn iron gets reduced into ferrous from with the help of Vitamin C and enters the blood stream. After entering the blood stream this ferrous iron is re-oxidised into ferric from unde the catalytic action of copper-binding protein ceruloplasmin, and combines with iron binding globulin transferrin or iderophilin of the plasma. Thus the Transferrin iron complex is the transport form of iron of the plasma and is carried to the different tissues of the body. The protein-bound iron in the plasma per 100 ml is about 120-140 mcg in males, and 90-120 mcg in females. The total iron-binding capacity is about 300-360 mcg per 100 ml in both sexes.

PCOS And Infection Can Also Cause Heart Disease

PCOS And Infection Can Also Cause Heart Disease

The Savvy Woman's Guide to PCOS: The Many Faces Of A 21st Century Epidemic... And What You Can Do About It. (Paperback)
by Elizabeth Lee Vliet

Heart disease can be caused by a number of risk factors, for example, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, unhealthy diet and habits, laziness, obesity as well as some uncontrollable factors like family history of heart disease. Nevertheless, there are at least two other risk factors, namely PCOS and infection, that could also trigger heart disease or even heart attack.

PCOS (Polycystic ovary syndrome) is found to be a serious disorder that can eventually lead to diabetes and even heart attack. But one does not need to have cysts on the ovaries to have PCOS. This is the warning made by The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. If a woman have two or more of the symptoms such as infertility, severe acne, excess face or hair body hair, male-like balding, irregular periods, ovarian cysts, high blood pressure, weight problems, or elevated insulin levels, then she could be a candidate of PCOS and is advised to check with her doctor about PCOS. Taking a blood test is necessary to check numerous hormone levels.

PCOS affects not just reproduction. Although it is agreed that women usually do not get heart disease until after menopause, some experts do believe that patients’ arteries are already significantly hardening in their 30s especially for those obese woman, their risk of Type 2 diabetes is 3 to 7 times higher than average. Please also take note that skinny women or even those who have had children can still get PCOS.

Exercise and Healthy Weight can reduce Breast Cancer risk in Postmenopausal Women

Exercise and Healthy Weight can reduce Breast Cancer risk in Postmenopausal Women

Stock Photo

Postmenopausal women had reduced their risk by staying physically active and keeping their weight in a normal BMI rating. This study was from the Women’s Health Initiative and will be published in the journal Obesity.

Researchers found that the women that had the lowest body-mass-index (BMI) and were the most physically active had the lowest amounts of estrogens circulating in their body. Extra estrogen hormone in post menopausal women is known to promote breast cancer to grow.

"Women with high levels of estrogens have a two-to-four-times-higher risk of breast cancer than women with very low levels," said Anne McTiernan, M.D., Ph.D a member of the Hutchinson Center's Public Health Sciences Division and co-investigator of the Women's Health Initiative Clinical Coordinating Center, which is based at the Center. "If a woman can keep her own natural estrogens lower after menopause, it is probably going to be beneficial in terms of reducing her risk of breast cancer."

Syndicate content
Share/Save/Bookmark

      

Post to Facebook

Important: The material on Best Syndication is for informational purposes only and is not meant to be advice. Authors may have or will receive monetary compensation from the company's product/s mentioned. You should always seek professional advice before making any legal, financial or medical decisions and this website cannot substitute or replace any trained professional consultation.
Use of this site means that you agree to our TERMS OF SERVICE

Advertise On This Site
Copyright © 2006-2015 By Best Syndication All Rights Reserved