Legal Issues

Massive Arrests of over 10,000 Fugitives in Eastern US

Massive Arrests of over 10,000 Fugitives in Eastern US

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The law enforcement of 24 states along the east coast arrested 10,773 fugitives from October 22nd – 28th. The operation was called FALCON III (Federal and Local Cops Organized Nationally) and was led by the U.S. Marshals Service in an effort to arrest the worst fugitive felons.

There was 1,659 suspected sex offenders arrested reported Attorney General Alberto Gonzales at a news conference in Washington. Others that were arrested were 364 gang members and 107 people that were wanted for murder. Other arrests were made for charges with kidnapping, burglary, carjacking, weapons offenses, and drug distribution.

This is the FALCON programs 3rd roundup. The last roundup was conducted in the west coast of the US and arrested 9,037 fugitives. On average the Marshals Service will arrest 1,000 fugitives in a week. It is estimated that there are an estimated 1 million fugitives at large in the US.

Scaffolding Accidents in the UK

Scaffolding Accidents in the UK

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Scaffolding Accidents in the UK

We all know how hazardous shoddy scaffolding can be. Insecure bracing, poor materials, unsafe construction, lack of attention to safety board regulations – all lead to scaffolding accidents all over the UK.

An estimated 2.3 million construction workers, or 65 percent of the construction industry, work on scaffolds frequently. Protecting these workers from scaffold-related accidents may prevent some of the 4,500 injuries and 50 deaths every year, which cost employers £90 million in workdays lost. In a recent BLS study, 72 percent of workers injured in scaffold accidents attributed the accident either to the planking or support giving way, or to the employee slipping or being struck by a falling object.

Are Credit Card Companies creating a Legal Liability for Inappropriately Issuing Accounts?

Are Credit Card Companies creating a Legal Liability for Inappropriately Issuing Accounts?

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Adam J. Goldstein, who works for a Chicago law firm, wrote in the recent issue of University of Illinois Law Review his beliefs that credit card companies are encouraging high levels of consumer debt because they take advantage of a "consumers' cognitive and behavioral vulnerabilities."

We all see an onslaught of credit card offers that arrive in the mail every day. Sometimes it is for a new credit card or checks for cash advances. It seems like these offers along with low interest promotional rates for transfers are luring people into further debt.

Goldstein points out that other lending activities, such as for a car, house, or other loans are all put through a credit screening process. These very same banks also offer credit cards which are loans. The credit card loans are at a higher rate. Goldstein said in this report that "people with bad credit histories, as well as those who have declared bankruptcy or who have an income level that is too low to justify the credit lines that they are given, all receive high-interest credit."

The New Bankruptcy “Means Test” Explained in Plain English

The New Bankruptcy “Means Test” Explained in Plain English

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With the new bankruptcy law in effect as of October 17, 2005, there is a lot of confusion regarding the new "means test" requirement. The means test will be used by the courts to determine eligibility for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. The purpose of this article is to explain in plain language how the means test works, so that consumers can get a better idea of how they will be affected under the new rules.

When most people think of bankruptcy, they think in terms of Chapter 7, where the unsecured debts are normally discharged in full. Bankruptcy of any variety is a difficult ordeal at best, but at least with Chapter 7, a debtor was able to wipe out their debts in full and get a fresh start. Chapter 13, however, is another story, since the debtor must pay back a significant portion of the debt over a 3-5 year period, with 5 years being the standard under the new law.

Forest Labs Bogged Down With Celexa Legal Woes

Forest Labs Bogged Down With Celexa Legal Woes

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According to Forest Laboratories Annual Report for the year ending March 31, 2006, the company's antidepressant franchise, consisting of Celexa and Lexapro, accounted for 68% of the company's sales.

But the flip-side of the coin is that Forest Labs is currently facing a wide variety of legal problems involving civil lawsuits and government investigations that could result in fines and damage awards that will off-set the profits from its top selling drugs for many years to come.

Celexa and Lexapro belong to the relatively new class of antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Celexa was developed by the Danish pharmaceutical firm, H. Lundbeck A/S and was introduced into the US market by Forest Laboratories and Parke-Davis in September 1998.

According to its Annual Report filed with the SEC on June 14, 2006, Forest Labs is a defendant in approximately 25 active product liability lawsuits, with most of the complaints alleging that Celexa or Lexapro caused or contributed to persons committing or attempting suicide.

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