Allergy and Skin

Counterfeit Botox Treatments investigated on ‘Dr. Oz’ TV show

hypodermic needle

Best Syndication News

(Best Syndication News) - On Tuesday’s ‘Dr. Oz’ TV show, there was an investigation into bad Botox treatments using counterfeit medication. Allergan, Inc., the marketers of Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA), is safe when used by the appropriate medical professionals. However, Dr. Oz had shown that discussed how some doctors and others are selling and using counterfeit onabotulinumtoxinA that can lead to devastating results.

Dr. Oz explained that Botox treatments have become popular at home Botox parties, kiosks in malls, and even by mail order. He said that it is against the law to administer the toxin without having the proper medical license.

What made the 'Dr. Oz' show even scarier is that you have to be careful when going to a medical doctor to get Botox treatments. Medical doctors can gain certification within 24 hours to administer Botox treatments. The problem is they may not be specialized in dermatology or plastic surgery. This may lead to unwanted results. In addition, there are counterfeit Botox on the market that can end with serious complications.

Shingles Vaccine Zostavax approved for 50 to 59 year old people

Shingles Vaccine Zostavax approved for 50 to 59 year old people

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(Best Syndication News) - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) extended the approval for the Zostavax shingles vaccine to allow for people ranging between 50 and 59 years old to receive the preventive treatment. Previously the shingles vaccine was only approved for people 60 years and older which originally gained FDA approval on May 26, 2006. The Zostavax shingles vaccine is manufactured by Merck & Co. Inc.

Shingles is caused from the varicella-zoster virus and is also the same virus that causes Chickenpox. The person that had Chickenpox has the virus remain dormant in some of the body's nerves. Many years later, usually in old age the virus can re-emerge in the form of shingles. The elderly and those with a weakened immune system are more likely to develop shingles.

Melanoma skin cancer treatment approved by FDA

(Best Syndication News) - Yervoy (ipilimumab) which is marketed by New York City-based Bristol-Myers Squibb gained the US Food and Drug (FDA) approval for treatment of late-stage metastatic melanoma skin cancer. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer according to the National Cancer Institute. In 2010, there were around 8,700 people that died from melanoma skin cancer.

Yervoy is the first therapy treatment to show that it has extended the life of people diagnosed with last-stage melanoma and to be approved by the FDA. The Yervoy drug treatment is given intravenously.

Lupus Treatment Benlysta gets FDA approval

Lupus Treatment Benlysta gets FDA approval

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(Best Syndication News) - The US Food and Drug Administration approved the treatment, Benlysta (belimumab), for the treatment of Lupus. The last time the FDA approved a medication to treat lupus was 56 years ago, which was Plaquenil (hydroxychloroquine) and corticosteroids. Benlysta was developed by Human Genome Sciences Inc., based in Rockville, Md., and will be co-marketed in the US with GlaxoSmithKline.

Benlysta is delivered by intravenous infusion or directly into a vein. It is the first of its kind designed to inhibit the B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) protein. The treatment may reduce the amount of B cells. Lupus is believed to have problems with abnormal levels of B cells.

Benlysta is for treating patients that have active, autoantibody-positive lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus) and are also receiving traditional treatments of corticosteroids, antimalarials, immunosuppressives, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

Scientists turns Human Skin into Blood

Scientists turns Human Skin into Blood

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(Best Syndication News) - Scientists from McMaster University Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institue which is part of the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine made a breakthrough discovery to turn a person's skin into human blood. The groundbreaking research is be published in the current issue of the science journal 'Nature.'

Mick Bhatia, who is the scientific director at the McMaster Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute along with his colleagues demonstrated that making blood from skin is a direct conversion process. The scientists showed that this worked using human skin as well. They tested duplicated the process of turning skin into blood and it works with all ages or people. Hope for clinical trials studies are anticipated by the researchers to be as soon as 2012.

If the process of making blood from human skin develops into a medical application it could be possible for people could make their own blood from their skin from anything from blood needed for surgical procedures, cancer treatments and certain anemia conditions.

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