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Heart Attacks Patients that suffered from Heart Attack Damage used Stem Cells to Repair the Heart Muscle

April 23rd, 2006

Heart Attacks  Patients that suffered from Heart Attack Damage used Stem Cells to Repair the Heart Muscle

Rush University

A recent study transplanted stem cells to see if the heart muscle would regenerate after a patient had a heart attack.  The researchers delivered the adult mesenchymal stem cells that came from a healthy bone marrow donor by intravenous infusion.

This simple approach of using a standard IV line makes it less invasive than other methods of delivering stem cells.  Other procedures of delivering stem cells involved open surgical procedures through catheterization.

"A person who has had a single, severe heart attack may survive but can be left with substantial damage to the heart muscle as a result of the blood supply to the heart muscle being cut off during the heart attack. The damaged muscle inhibits the heart's overall ability to pump blood, leading to heart failure," said Rush principal investigator cardiologist Dr. Gary Schaer, head of the Rush Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory. Rush is the only center in Illinois participating in the trial. There are 15 other sites nationwide participating in the study.

 

Schaer describes the mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) as having the opportunity for the cells to help develop mature heart cells and new blood vessels in the heart.  The donor MSC cells come from healthy adults that volunteer to donate bone marrow.  They do not come from fetus, embryo or animal stem cells.

There is not enough knowledge from this type of transplant if there is immune response that could possibly happen.  This study is in its early stages and so far they believe it does not cause an allergic response from this type of MSC stem cell transplant.  They MSC stem cells are similar to Blood Type O and they are using the stem cells without tissue type matching in the patient receiving the IV.

 

Schaer also said that one donor can create treatments for thousands of patients.  The MSC stem cells are grown in a culture to high numbers.  One donation of stem cells can potentially grown billions MSCs.  The scientists can also freeze the cells for years at a time and can revive them when they are needed for an implant.

The MSC stem cells seek out the heart if damage has occurred to help in the repair after a heart attack has occurred.  When the researchers tested the MSC stem cells on animals that did not have a heart attack, the cells were reabsorbed back into the bone marrow.  The MSC stem cells seek out were inflammatory signals were given out in the body and will help aid in the repair of these damaged sites.

 
 
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Nicole Wilson
Best Syndication

Books on Heart Disease

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Important:  The material on Best Syndication is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for any medical conditions. You should promptly seek professional medical care if you have any concern about your health, and you should always consult your physician before starting a fitness program.
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Copyright 2005 Best Syndication                   Last Updated Saturday, July 10, 2010 09:48 PM