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Common NSAID Pain Killers Increase Risk of Heart Failure Hospital Stays - Drugs Commonly Used for Osteo-Arthritis - Tylenol is Not a NSAID

May 22nd 2006

Common NSAID Pain Killers Increase Risk of Heart Failure Hospital Stays - Drugs Commonly Used for Osteo-Arthritis - Tylenol is Not a NSAID

Health

Researchers found that older patients with heart failure that used nonsteroidal anti-inflamatories (NSAIDs) regularly had an increased risk of being admitted to the hospital for heart failure for the first time.  These NSAIDs include ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, indomethacin and meloxicam, and are commonly used to treat arthritis.

After taking into account other factors, heart failure patients between the age of 60 and 84 had a 30 percent increased chance of being admitted to the hospital for heart failure for the first time.  They found that a previous diagnosis of heart failure, obesity, being a smoker, and a history of recent specialist appointments and inpatient stays were all associated with a greater chance of being admitted to hospital for heart failure for the first time.

 

 

The research, published in the Heart Online First 2006, is based on data from the General Practice Research Database, which holds the anonymous medical records of millions of patients registered with family doctors across the UK.  The patients were identified and monitored between January 1st 1997 and December 31st 2000. 

The overall risk is considered small, but the researchers say it may have a considerable impact on public health, particularly among the elderly in whom heart failure is common.  Fourteen percent of patients were taking NSAIDs at the time of their admission compared with 10% of the comparison group of randomly selected people. Half of those admitted to hospital were men, and half were aged between 70 and 79.

 

The NSAID, indomethacin, seemed to be associated with the highest risk.  These patients were three times more likely to be admitted to the hospital for heart failure as those taking not taking the drug. Even though the extra risk is only on hospital admission in every 1000, it could be higher for patients over the age of 70 with other conditions including diabetes, high blood pressure, or kidney failure.

According to the Wise Geek website, NSAIDs are Non-Steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs that include aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxin, among many others. Acetaminophen, commonly known by the brand name Tylenol, is sometimes considered an NSAID, but actually has very little anti-inflammatory benefit. NSAIDs are used to treat pain, fever, and inflammation, and are generally considered to be fairly safe and well tolerated by most patients.

According to Bill Pearse with McNeil Consumer Health Care, Tylenol is acetaminophen and not a NSAID. 

 
 
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Dan Wilson
Best Syndication

Books on Heart Disease

Keywords and misspellings:  nasid staroidal vioxx asprin tilenol hart falure


Important:  The material on Best Syndication is for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for any medical conditions. You should promptly seek professional medical care if you have any concern about your health, and you should always consult your physician before starting a fitness program.
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Copyright 2005 Best Syndication                   Last Updated Saturday, July 10, 2010 09:51 PM